Horizon Win10 logon black screen delay

This post was originally published on this site

I’m building a 1909 Win 10 gold image vm and i’m running into an issue of a black screen delay when windows begins to login.

 

6.7U3

Horizon 7.10

DEM 7.11

 

1.  Hosts are using physical Nvidia GPUs.

2.  Ran the OSOT allowing Windows updates along with a couple apps (calculator etc.)  Everything else is pretty much default using the Windows 10 1909-2004 template.

3.  I’m currently running an earlier build in production, during logon, all i see is waiting with a delayed spinning circle, which eventually goes to Preparing Desktop (circle runs smoother in this stage) followed by an immediate Windows desktop.  In the current 1909 build that i’m getting prepared for production, it goes through at logon with applying vmware dem, gpos etc displayed on the screen, once thats complete it goes to preparing for a few seconds and goes to a solid black screen that is delayed by like 15 seconds…  it also seems that the startup apps take longer to start in this build post optimizations as well.  Has anyone experienced this?

4.  Lastly, everything else is great other than the dreaded start menu click delaying for 3 seconds or so , sometimes its immediate, but most times there is a noticable delay with the start button as well as Windows search.  Is there anything that addresses this outside of the OSOT that i’m missing?

 

Thanks for any insight!

AWS App2Container – A New Containerizing Tool for Java and ASP.NET Applications

This post was originally published on this site

Our customers are increasingly developing their new applications with containers and serverless technologies, and are using modern continuous integration and delivery (CI/CD) tools to automate the software delivery life cycle. They also maintain a large number of existing applications that are built and managed manually or using legacy systems. Maintaining these two sets of applications with disparate tooling adds to operational overhead and slows down the pace of delivering new business capabilities. As much as possible, they want to be able to standardize their management tooling and CI/CD processes across both their existing and new applications, and see the option of packaging their existing applications into containers as the first step towards accomplishing that goal.

However, containerizing existing applications requires a long list of manual tasks such as identifying application dependencies, writing dockerfiles, and setting up build and deployment processes for each application. These manual tasks are time consuming, error prone, and can slow down the modernization efforts.

Today, we are launching AWS App2Container, a new command-line tool that helps containerize existing applications that are running on-premises, in Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), or in other clouds, without needing any code changes. App2Container discovers applications running on a server, identifies their dependencies, and generates relevant artifacts for seamless deployment to Amazon ECS and Amazon EKS. It also provides integration with AWS CodeBuild and AWS CodeDeploy to enable a repeatable way to build and deploy containerized applications.

AWS App2Container generates the following artifacts for each application component: Application artifacts such as application files/folders, Dockerfiles, container images in Amazon Elastic Container Registry (ECR), ECS Task definitions, Kubernetes deployment YAML, CloudFormation templates to deploy the application to Amazon ECS or EKS, and templates to set up a build/release pipeline in AWS Codepipeline which also leverages AWS CodeBuild and CodeDeploy.

Starting today, you can use App2Container to containerize ASP.NET (.NET 3.5+) web applications running in IIS 7.5+ on Windows, and Java applications running on Linux—standalone JBoss, Apache Tomcat, and generic Java applications such as Spring Boot, IBM WebSphere, Oracle WebLogic, etc.

By modernizing existing applications using containers, you can make them portable, increase development agility, standardize your CI/CD processes, and reduce operational costs. Now let’s see how it works!

AWS App2Container – Getting Started
AWS App2Container requires that the following prerequisites be installed on the server(s) hosting your application: AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) version 1.14 or later, Docker tools, and (in the case of ASP.NET) Powershell 5.0+ for applications running on Windows. Additionally, you need to provide appropriate IAM permissions to App2Container to interact with AWS services.

For example, let’s look how you containerize your existing Java applications. App2Container CLI for Linux is packaged as a tar.gz archive. The file provides users an interactive shell script, install.sh to install the App2Container CLI. Running the script guides users through the install steps and also updates the user’s path to include the App2Container CLI commands.

First, you can begin by running a one-time initialization on the installed server for the App2Container CLI with the init command.

$ sudo app2container init
Workspace directory path for artifacts[default:  /home/ubuntu/app2container/ws]:
AWS Profile (configured using 'aws configure --profile')[default: default]:  
Optional S3 bucket for application artifacts (Optional)[default: none]: 
Report usage metrics to AWS? (Y/N)[default: y]:
Require images to be signed using Docker Content Trust (DCT)? (Y/N)[default: n]:
Configuration saved

This sets up a workspace to store application containerization artifacts (minimum 20GB of disk space available). You can extract them into your Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) bucket using your AWS profile configured to use AWS services.

Next, you can view Java processes that are running on the application server by using the inventory command. Each Java application process has a unique identifier (for example, java-tomcat-9e8e4799) which is the application ID. You can use this ID to refer to the application with other App2Container CLI commands.

$ sudo app2container inventory
{
    "java-jboss-5bbe0bec": {
        "processId": 27366,
        "cmdline": "java ... /home/ubuntu/wildfly-10.1.0.Final/modules org.jboss.as.standalone -Djboss.home.dir=/home/ubuntu/wildfly-10.1.0.Final -Djboss.server.base.dir=/home/ubuntu/wildfly-10.1.0.Final/standalone ",
        "applicationType": "java-jboss"
    },
    "java-tomcat-9e8e4799": {
        "processId": 2537,
        "cmdline": "/usr/bin/java ... -Dcatalina.home=/home/ubuntu/tomee/apache-tomee-plume-7.1.1 -Djava.io.tmpdir=/home/ubuntu/tomee/apache-tomee-plume-7.1.1/temp org.apache.catalina.startup.Bootstrap start ",
        "applicationType": "java-tomcat"
    }
}

You can also intialize ASP.NET applications on an administrator-run PowerShell session of Windows Servers with IIS version 7.0 or later. Note that Docker tools and container support are available on Windows Server 2016 and later versions. You can select to run all app2container operations on the application server with Docker tools installed or use a worker machine with Docker tools using Amazon ECS-optimized Windows Server AMIs.

PS> app2container inventory
{
    "iis-smarts-51d2dbf8": {
        "siteName": "nopCommerce39",
        "bindings": "http/*:90:",
        "applicationType": "iis"
    }
}

The inventory command displays all IIS websites on the application server that can be containerized. Each IIS website process has a unique identifier (for example, iis-smarts-51d2dbf8) which is the application ID. You can use this ID to refer to the application with other App2Container CLI commands.

You can choose a specific application by referring to its application ID and generate an analysis report for the application by using the analyze command.

$ sudo app2container analyze --application-id java-tomcat-9e8e4799
Created artifacts folder /home/ubuntu/app2container/ws/java-tomcat-9e8e4799
Generated analysis data in /home/ubuntu/app2container/ws/java-tomcat-9e8e4799/analysis.json
Analysis successful for application java-tomcat-9e8e4799
Please examine the same, make appropriate edits and initiate containerization using "app2container containerize --application-id java-tomcat-9e8e4799"

You can use the analysis.json template generated by the application analysis to gather information on the analyzed application that helps identify all system dependencies from the analysisInfo section, and update containerization parameters to customize the container images generated for the application using the containerParameters section.

$ cat java-tomcat-9e8e4799/analysis.json
{
    "a2CTemplateVersion": "1.0",
	"createdTime": "2020-06-24 07:40:5424",
    "containerParameters": {
        "_comment1": "*** EDITABLE: The below section can be edited according to the application requirements. Please see the analyisInfo section below for deetails discoverd regarding the application. ***",
        "imageRepository": "java-tomcat-9e8e4799",
        "imageTag": "latest",
        "containerBaseImage": "ubuntu:18.04",
        "coopProcesses": [ 6446, 6549, 6646]
    },
    "analysisInfo": {
        "_comment2": "*** NON-EDITABLE: Analysis Results ***",
        "processId": 2537
        "appId": "java-tomcat-9e8e4799",
		"userId": "1000",
        "groupId": "1000",
        "cmdline": [...],
        "os": {...},
        "ports": [...]
    }
}

Also, you can run the $ app2container extract --application-id java-tomcat-9e8e4799 command to generate an application archive for the analyzed application. This depends on the analysis.json file generated earlier in the workspace folder for the application,and adheres to any containerization parameter updates specified in there. By using extract command, you can continue the workflow on a worker machine after running the first set of commands on the application server.

Now you can containerize command generated Docker images for the selected application.

$ sudo app2container containerize --application-id java-tomcat-9e8e4799
AWS pre-requisite check succeeded
Docker pre-requisite check succeeded
Extracted container artifacts for application
Entry file generated
Dockerfile generated under /home/ubuntu/app2container/ws/java-tomcat-9e8e4799/Artifacts
Generated dockerfile.update under /home/ubuntu/app2container/ws/java-tomcat-9e8e4799/Artifacts
Generated deployment file at /home/ubuntu/app2container/ws/java-tomcat-9e8e4799/deployment.json
Containerization successful. Generated docker image java-tomcat-9e8e4799
You're all set to test and deploy your container image.

Next Steps:
1. View the container image with "docker images" and test the application.
2. When you're ready to deploy to AWS, please edit the deployment file as needed at /home/ubuntu/app2container/ws/java-tomcat-9e8e4799/deployment.json.
3. Generate deployment artifacts using app2container generate app-deployment --application-id java-tomcat-9e8e4799

Using this command, you can view the generated container images using Docker images on the machine where the containerize command is run. You can use the docker run command to launch the container and test application functionality.

Note that in addition to generating container images, the containerize command also generates a deployment.json template file that you can use with the next generate-appdeployment command. You can edit the parameters in the deployment.json template file to change the image repository name to be registered in Amazon ECR, the ECS task definition parameters, or the Kubernetes App name.

$ cat java-tomcat-9e8e4799/deployment.json
{
       "a2CTemplateVersion": "1.0",
       "applicationId": "java-tomcat-9e8e4799",
       "imageName": "java-tomcat-9e8e4799",
       "exposedPorts": [
              {
                     "localPort": 8090,
                     "protocol": "tcp6"
              }
       ],
       "environment": [],
       "ecrParameters": {
              "ecrRepoTag": "latest"
       },
       "ecsParameters": {
              "createEcsArtifacts": true,
              "ecsFamily": "java-tomcat-9e8e4799",
              "cpu": 2,
              "memory": 4096,
              "dockerSecurityOption": "",
              "enableCloudwatchLogging": false,
              "publicApp": true,
              "stackName": "a2c-java-tomcat-9e8e4799-ECS",
              "reuseResources": {
                     "vpcId": "",
                     "cfnStackName": "",
                     "sshKeyPairName": ""
              },
              "gMSAParameters": {
                     "domainSecretsArn": "",
                     "domainDNSName": "",
                     "domainNetBIOSName": "",
                     "createGMSA": false,
                     "gMSAName": ""
              }
       },
       "eksParameters": {
              "createEksArtifacts": false,
              "applicationName": "",
              "stackName": "a2c-java-tomcat-9e8e4799-EKS",
              "reuseResources": {
                     "vpcId": "",
                     "cfnStackName": "",
                     "sshKeyPairName": ""
              }
       }
 }

At this point, the application workspace where the artifacts are generated serves as an iteration sandbox. You can choose to edit the Dockerfile generated here to make changes to their application and use the docker build command to build new container images as needed. You can generate the artifacts needed to deploy the application containers in Amazon EKS by using the generate-deployment command.

$ sudo app2container generate app-deployment --application-id java-tomcat-9e8e4799
AWS pre-requisite check succeeded
Docker pre-requisite check succeeded
Created ECR Repository
Uploaded Cloud Formation resources to S3 Bucket: none
Generated Cloud Formation Master template at: /home/ubuntu/app2container/ws/java-tomcat-9e8e4799/EksDeployment/amazon-eks-master.template.yaml
EKS Cloudformation templates and additional deployment artifacts generated successfully for application java-tomcat-9e8e4799

You're all set to use AWS Cloudformation to manage your application stack.
Next Steps:
1. Edit the cloudformation template as necessary.
2. Create an application stack using the AWS CLI or the AWS Console. AWS CLI command:

       aws cloudformation deploy --template-file /home/ubuntu/app2container/ws/java-tomcat-9e8e4799/EksDeployment/amazon-eks-master.template.yaml --capabilities CAPABILITY_NAMED_IAM --stack-name java-tomcat-9e8e4799

3. Setup a pipeline for your application stack:

       app2container generate pipeline --application-id java-tomcat-9e8e4799

This command works based on the deployment.json template file produced as part of running the containerize command. App2Container will now generate ECS/EKS cloudformation templates as well and an option to deploy those stacks.

The command registers the container image to user specified ECR repository, generates cloudformation template for Amazon ECS and EKS deployments. You can register ECS task definition with Amazon ECS and use kubectl to launch the containerized application on the existing Amazon EKS or self-managed kubernetes cluster using App2Container generated amazon-eks-master.template.deployment.yaml.

Alternatively, you can directly deploy containerized applications by --deploy options into Amazon EKS.

$ sudo app2container generate app-deployment --application-id java-tomcat-9e8e4799 --deploy
AWS pre-requisite check succeeded
Docker pre-requisite check succeeded
Created ECR Repository
Uploaded Cloud Formation resources to S3 Bucket: none
Generated Cloud Formation Master template at: /home/ubuntu/app2container/ws/java-tomcat-9e8e4799/EksDeployment/amazon-eks-master.template.yaml
Initiated Cloudformation stack creation. This may take a few minutes. Please visit the AWS Cloudformation Console to track progress.
Deploying application to EKS

Handling ASP.NET Applications with Windows Authentication
Containerizing ASP.NET applications is almost same process as Java applications, but Windows containers cannot be directly domain joined. They can however still use Active Directory (AD) domain identities to support various authentication scenarios.

App2Container detects if a site is using Windows authentication and accordingly makes the IIS site’s application pool run as the network service identity, and generates the new cloudformation templates for Windows authenticated IIS applications. The creation of gMSA and AD Security group, domain join ECS nodes and making containers use this gMSA are all taken care of by those templates.

Also, it provides two PowerShell scripts as output to the $ app2container containerize command along with an instruction file on how to use it.

The following is an example output:

PS C:Windowssystem32> app2container containerize --application-id iis-SmartStoreNET-a726ba0b
Running AWS pre-requisite check...
Running Docker pre-requisite check...
Container build complete. Please use "docker images" to view the generated container images.
Detected that the Site is using Windows Authentication.
Generating powershell scripts into C:UsersAdminAppDataLocalapp2containeriis-SmartStoreNET-a726ba0bArtifacts required to setup Container host with Windows Authentication
Please look at C:UsersAdminAppDataLocalapp2containeriis-SmartStoreNET-a726ba0bArtifactsWindowsAuthSetupInstructions.md for setup instructions on Windows Authentication.
A deployment file has been generated under C:UsersAdminAppDataLocalapp2containeriis-SmartStoreNET-a726ba0b
Please edit the same as needed and generate deployment artifacts using "app2container generate-deployment"

The first PowerShellscript, DomainJoinAddToSecGroup.ps1, joins the container host and adds it to an Active Directory security group. The second script, CreateCredSpecFile.ps1, creates a Group Managed Service Account (gMSA), grants access to the Active Directory security group, generates the credential spec for this gMSA, and stores it locally on the container host. You can execute these PowerShellscripts on the ECS host. The following is an example usage of the scripts:

PS C:Windowssystem32> .DomainJoinAddToSecGroup.ps1 -ADDomainName Dominion.com -ADDNSIp 10.0.0.1 -ADSecurityGroup myIISContainerHosts -CreateADSecurityGroup:$true
PS C:Windowssystem32> .CreateCredSpecFile.ps1 -GMSAName MyGMSAForIIS -CreateGMSA:$true -ADSecurityGroup myIISContainerHosts

Before executing the app2container generate-deployment command, edit the deployment.json file to change the value of dockerSecurityOption to the name of the CredentialSpec file that the CreateCredSpecFile script generated. For example,
"dockerSecurityOption": "credentialspec:file://dominion_mygmsaforiis.json"

Effectively, any access to network resource made by the IIS server inside the container for the site will now use the above gMSA to authenticate. The final step is to authorize this gMSA account on the network resources that the IIS server will access. A common example is authorizing this gMSA inside the SQL Server.

Finally, if the application must connect to a database to be fully functional and you run the container in Amazon ECS, ensure that the application container created from the Docker image generated by the tool has connectivity to the same database. You can refer to this documentation for options on migrating: MS SQL Server from Windows to Linux on AWS, Database Migration Service, and backup and restore your MS SQL Server to Amazon RDS.

Now Available
AWS App2Container is offered free. You only pay for the actual usage of AWS services like Amazon EC2, ECS, EKS, and S3 etc based on their usage. For details, please refer to App2Container FAQs and documentations. Give this a try, and please send us feedback either through your usual AWS Support contacts, on the AWS Forum for ECS, AWS Forum for EKS, or on the container roadmap on Github.

Channy;

Amazon RDS Proxy – Now Generally Available

This post was originally published on this site

At AWS re:Invent 2019, we launched the preview of Amazon RDS Proxy, a fully managed, highly available database proxy for Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) that makes applications more scalable, more resilient to database failures, and more secure. Following the preview of MySQL engine, we extended to the PostgreSQL compatibility. Today, I am pleased to announce that we are now generally available for both engines.

Many applications, including those built on modern serverless architectures using AWS Lambda, Fargate, Amazon ECS, or EKS can have a large number of open connections to the database server, and may open and close database connections at a high rate, exhausting database memory and compute resources.

Amazon RDS Proxy allows applications to pool and share connections established with the database, improving database efficiency, application scalability, and security. With RDS Proxy, failover times for Amazon Aurora and RDS databases are reduced by up to 66%, and database credentials, authentication, and access can be managed through integration with AWS Secrets Manager and AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM).

Amazon RDS Proxy can be enabled for most applications with no code change, and you don’t need to provision or manage any additional infrastructure and only pay per vCPU of the database instance for which the proxy is enabled.

Amazon RDS Proxy – Getting started
You can get started with Amazon RDS Proxy in just a few clicks by going to the AWS management console and creating an RDS Proxy endpoint for your RDS databases. In the navigation pane, choose Proxies and Create proxy. You can also see the proxy panel below.

To create your proxy, specify the Proxy identifier, a unique name of your choosing, and choose the database engine – either MySQL or PostgreSQL. Choose the encryption setting if you want the proxy to enforce TLS / SSL for all connection between application and proxy, and specify a time period that a client connection can be idle before the proxy can close it.

A client connection is considered idle when the application doesn’t submit a new request within the specified time after the previous request completed. The underlying connection between the proxy and database stays open and is returned to the connection pool. Thus, it’s available to be reused for new client connections.

Next, choose one RDS DB instance or Aurora DB cluster in Database to access through this proxy. The list only includes DB instances and clusters with compatible database engines, engine versions, and other settings.

Specify Connection pool maximum connections, a value between 1 and 100. This setting represents the percentage of the max_connections value that RDS Proxy can use for its connections. If you only intend to use one proxy with this DB instance or cluster, you can set it to 100. For details about how RDS Proxy uses this setting, see Connection Limits and Timeouts.

Choose at least one Secrets Manager secret associated with the RDS DB instance or Aurora DB cluster that you intend to access with this proxy, and select an IAM role that has permission to access the Secrets Manager secrets you chose. If you don’t have an existing secret, please click Create a new secret before setting up the RDS proxy.

After setting VPC Subnets and a security group, please click Create proxy. If you more settings in details, please refer to the documentation.

You can see the new RDS proxy after waiting a few minutes and then point your application to the RDS Proxy endpoint. That’s it!

You can also create an RDS proxy easily via AWS CLI command.

aws rds create-db-proxy 
    --db-proxy-name channy-proxy 
    --role-arn iam_role 
    --engine-family { MYSQL|POSTGRESQL } 
    --vpc-subnet-ids space_separated_list 
    [--vpc-security-group-ids space_separated_list] 
    [--auth ProxyAuthenticationConfig_JSON_string] 
    [--require-tls | --no-require-tls] 
    [--idle-client-timeout value] 
    [--debug-logging | --no-debug-logging] 
    [--tags comma_separated_list]

How RDS Proxy works
Let’s see an example that demonstrates how open connections continue working during a failover when you reboot a database or it becomes unavailable due to a problem. This example uses a proxy named channy-proxy and an Aurora DB cluster with DB instances instance-8898 and instance-9814. When the failover-db-cluster command is run from the Linux command line, the writer instance that the proxy is connected to changes to a different DB instance. You can see that the DB instance associated with the proxy changes while the connection remains open.

$ mysql -h channy-proxy.proxy-abcdef123.us-east-1.rds.amazonaws.com -u admin_user -p
Enter password:
...
mysql> select @@aurora_server_id;
+--------------------+
| @@aurora_server_id |
+--------------------+
| instance-9814 |
+--------------------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)

mysql>
[1]+ Stopped mysql -h channy-proxy.proxy-abcdef123.us-east-1.rds.amazonaws.com -u admin_user -p
$ # Initially, instance-9814 is the writer.
$ aws rds failover-db-cluster --db-cluster-id cluster-56-2019-11-14-1399
JSON output
$ # After a short time, the console shows that the failover operation is complete.
$ # Now instance-8898 is the writer.
$ fg
mysql -h channy-proxy.proxy-abcdef123.us-east-1.rds.amazonaws.com -u admin_user -p

mysql> select @@aurora_server_id;
+--------------------+
| @@aurora_server_id |
+--------------------+
| instance-8898 |
+--------------------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)

mysql>
[1]+ Stopped mysql -h channy-proxy.proxy-abcdef123.us-east-1.rds.amazonaws.com -u admin_user -p
$ aws rds failover-db-cluster --db-cluster-id cluster-56-2019-11-14-1399
JSON output
$ # After a short time, the console shows that the failover operation is complete.
$ # Now instance-9814 is the writer again.
$ fg
mysql -h channy-proxy.proxy-abcdef123.us-east-1.rds.amazonaws.com -u admin_user -p

mysql> select @@aurora_server_id;
+--------------------+
| @@aurora_server_id |
+--------------------+
| instance-9814 |
+--------------------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)
+---------------+---------------+
| Variable_name | Value |
+---------------+---------------+
| hostname | ip-10-1-3-178 |
+---------------+---------------+
1 row in set (0.02 sec)

With RDS Proxy, you can build applications that can transparently tolerate database failures without needing to write complex failure handling code. RDS Proxy automatically routes traffic to a new database instance while preserving application connections.

You can review the demo for an overview of RDS Proxy and the steps you need take to access RDS Proxy from a Lambda function.

If you want to know how your serverless applications maintain excellent performance even at peak loads, please read this blog post. For a deeper dive into using RDS Proxy for MySQL with serverless, visit this post.

The following are a few things that you should be aware of:

  • Currently, RDS Proxy is available for the MySQL and PostgreSQL engine family. This engine family includes RDS for MySQL 5.6 and 5.7, PostgreSQL 10.11 and 11.5.
  • In an Aurora cluster, all of the connections in the connection pool are handled by the Aurora primary instance. To perform load balancing for read-intensive workloads, you still use the reader endpoint directly for the Aurora cluster.
  • Your RDS Proxy must be in the same VPC as the database. Although the database can be publicly accessible, the proxy can’t be.
  • Proxies don’t support compressed mode. For example, they don’t support the compression used by the --compress or -C options of the mysql command.

Now Available!
Amazon RDS Proxy is generally available in US East (N. Virginia), US East (Ohio), US West (N. California), US West (Oregon), Europe (Frankfurt), Europe (Ireland), Europe (London) , Asia Pacific (Mumbai), Asia Pacific (Seoul), Asia Pacific (Singapore), Asia Pacific (Sydney) and Asia Pacific (Tokyo) regions for Aurora MySQL, RDS for MySQL, Aurora PostgreSQL, and RDS for PostgreSQL, and it includes support for Aurora Serverless and Aurora Multi-Master.

Take a look at the product page, pricing, and the documentation to learn more. Please send us feedback either in the AWS forum for Amazon RDS or through your usual AWS support contacts.

Channy;

WSO UEM 2005 issues with on-prem?

This post was originally published on this site

I’m getting ready to upgrade from 1907 and was wondering if anyone has upgraded to to 2005 on-prem.  If you have upgraded, did you experience any issues. 

 

I’m upgrading to get to the latest version and also resolve an issue where the VMWare Tunnel (via the UAG) will lose it credentials every 6 months and stop working.  Also, there was an issue where the tunnel settings page wouldn’t load because of a similar issue.

 

I could go to 2001 but will be in the same boat soon enough where I need to upgrade.

 

Any feedback is appreciated.

 

Joe Beaty

DatastoreCluster Reporting

This post was originally published on this site

Hey all,

 

Is it possible to report on all the datastores that are in the cluster?  For instance, we have a Datastore Cluster that has 16 datastores inside of it.  I want to traverse by each cluster and get results for the entire Datastore Cluster and not each individual datastore.  This is what I have been using but it returns every single datastore. 

 

javascript:;Get-Datastore  |
Select @{N='Datacenter';E={$_.Datacenter.Name}},
    @{N='DSC';E={Get-DatastoreCluster -Datastore $_ | Select -ExpandProperty Name}}, 
    Name,CapacityGB,@{N='FreespaceGB';E={[math]::Round($_.FreespaceGB,2)}},
    @{N='ProvisionedSpaceGB';E={[math]::Round(($_.ExtensionData.Summary.Capacity - $_.Extensiondata.Summary.FreeSpace + $_.ExtensionData.Summary.Uncommitted)/1GB,2)}},
    @{N='UnCommittedGB';E={[math]::Round($_.ExtensionData.Summary.Uncommitted/1GB,2)}},
    @{N='VM';E={$_.ExtensionData.VM.Count}} | Format-Table -AutoSize

preferred audio output

This post was originally published on this site

Hi all,

Horizon 7.10

Windows 10 1903

Linked Clones

 

We have two different types of clients which uses two separate types of audio hardware. Our issues is that a subset of users are having to set the audio driver every time they login. 

 

The default audio driver in the golden image is Vmware audio driver.

 

We have some users that use a zero client to connect to our VDI environment and use a headset with microphone. The only way to get headset and mic to work on the headset is use to the Teradici audio driver. 

 

each user has the audio output option of Vmware or Teradici.  When they choose the audio driver, its reset after logoff/logon.

 

how can we solve this?

 

Thank you.

AA20-182A: EINSTEIN Data Trends – 30-day Lookback

This post was originally published on this site

Original release date: June 30, 2020

Summary

Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) analysts have compiled the top detection signatures that have been the most active over the month of May in our national Intrusion Detection System (IDS), known as EINSTEIN. This information is meant to give the reader a closer look into what analysts are seeing at the national level and provide technical details on some of the most active threats.

IDS is a network tool that uses sensors to monitor inbound and outbound traffic to search for any type of suspicious activity or known threats, alerting analysts when a specific traffic pattern matches with an associated threat. IDS allows users to deploy signatures on these boundary sensors to look for the specific pattern, or network indicator, associated with a known threat.

The EINSTEIN Program is an automated process for collecting, correlating, analyzing, and sharing computer security information across the federal civilian departments and agencies. By collecting information from participating federal departments and agencies, CISA builds and enhances our Nation’s cyber-related situational awareness.

The signatures CISA created have been included below for analysts across various organizations to use in enhancing their own network defenses. Note: CISA has created and tested these signatures in an environment that might not be the same for all organizations, so administrators may need to make changes or updates before using in the following signatures in their local environments.

Technical Details

Note: the below Snort signatures accounted for over 90 percent of what CISA analysts identified as potential threats using the IDS system for detection.

1. NetSupport Manager RAT

Description

The NetSupport Manager Remote Access Tool (RAT) is a legitimate program that, once installed on a victim’s machine, allows remote administrative control. In a malicious context, it can—among many other functions—be used to steal information. Malicious RATs can be difficult to detect because they do not normally appear in lists of running programs, and they can mimic the behavior of legitimate applications.

Examples

In January 2020, Palo Alto researchers observed the abuse of NetSupport in targeted phishing email campaigns.[1] In November 2019, Zscaler researchers observed “software update-themed” campaigns tricking users into installing a malicious NetSupport Manager RAT.[2] The earliest malicious use of NetSupport was seen in a phishing email campaign—reported by FireEye researchers in April 2018.[3]

Snort Signature

alert tcp any any -> any $HTTP_PORTS (msg:"NetSupportManager:HTTP Client Header contains 'User-Agent|3a 20|NetSupport Manager/'"; flow:established,to_server; flowbits:isnotset,.tagged; content:"User-Agent|3a 20|NetSupport Manager/"; http_header; fast_pattern:only; content:"CMD="; nocase; http_client_body; depth:4; content:"POST"; nocase; http_method; flowbits:set,.; classtype:http-header; reference:url,unit42.paloaltonetworks.com/cortex-xdr-detects-netsupport-manager-rat-campaign/; reference:url,www.pentestpartners.com/security-blog/how-to-reverse-engineer-a-protocol/; reference:url,github.com/silence-is-best/c2db;

2. Kovter

Description

Kovter is a fileless Trojan with several variants. This malware started as ransomware that malicious actors used to trick victims into thinking that they need to pay their local police a fine. Cyber actors have also used Kovter to perform click-fraud operations to infect targets and send stolen information from the target machines to command and control servers. Kovter’s evolving features have allowed this malware to rank among the Center for Internet Security’s most prolific malware year after year.[4] See CISA’s Webinar on Combatting Ransomware for additional information on Kovter.

Snort Signature

alert tcp any any -> any $HTTP_PORTS (msg:"Kovter:HTTP URI POST to CnC Server";; flow:established,to_server; flowbits:isnotset,.tagged; content:"POST / HTTP/1.1"; depth:15; content:"Content-Type|3a 20|application/x-www-form-urlencoded"; http_header; depth:47; fast_pattern; content:"User-Agent|3a 20|Mozilla/"; http_header; content:!"LOADCURRENCY"; nocase; content:!"Accept"; http_header; content:!"Referer|3a|"; http_header; content:!"Cookie|3a|"; nocase; http_header; pcre:"/^(?:[A-Za-z0-9+/]{4})*(?:[A-Za-z0-9+/]{2}==|[A-Za-z0-9+/]{3}=|[A-Za-z0-9+/]{4})$/P"; pcre:"/User-Agentx3a[^rn]+rnHostx3ax20(?:d{1,3}.){3}d{1,3}rnContent-Lengthx3ax20[1-5][0-9]{2,3}rn(?:Cache-Control|Pragma)x3a[^rn]+rn(?:rn)?$/H";; classtype:nonstd-tcp;; reference:url,www.malware-traffic-analysis.net/2017/06/29/index2.html;

3. XMRig

Description

XMRig is a type of cryptocurrency miner that uses the resources of an unsuspecting infected machine to mine Monero—a type of cryptocurrency. XMRig can cause a victim computer to overheat and perform poorly by using additional system resources that would otherwise not be active.

Snort Signature

alert tcp any any -> any !25 (msg:"XMRIG:Non-Std TCP Client Traffic contains JSONRPC 2.0 Config Data";; flow:established,to_server; flowbits:isnotset; content:"|22|jsonrpc|22 3a 22|2.0|22|"; distance:0; content:"|22|method|22 3a 22|login|22|"; distance:0; content:"|22|agent|22 3a 22|XMRig"; nocase; distance:0; fast_pattern; content:"libuv/"; nocase; distance:0; content:!"|22|login|22 3a 22|x|22|"; flowbits:set,; classtype:nonstd-tcp;; reference:url,malware-traffic-analysis.net/2017/11/12/index.html; reference:url,www.mysonicwall.com/sonicalert/searchresults.aspx?ev=article&id=1101;

Mitigations

CISA recommends using the following best practices to strengthen the security posture of an organization’s systems. Any configuration changes should be reviewed by system owners and administrators prior to implementation to avoid unwanted impacts.

  • Maintain up-to-date antivirus signatures and engines. See Protecting Against Malicious Code.
  • Ensure systems have the latest security updates. See Understanding Patches and Software Updates.
  • Disable file and printer sharing services. If these services are required, use strong passwords or Active Directory authentication.
  • Restrict users’ permissions to install and run unwanted software applications. Do not add users to the local administrators’ group unless required.
  • Enforce a strong password policy. See Choosing and Protecting Passwords.
  • Exercise caution when opening email attachments, even if the attachment is expected and the sender appears to be known. See Using Caution with Email Attachments.
  • Enable a personal firewall on agency workstations that is configured to deny unsolicited connection requests.
  • Disable unnecessary services on agency workstations and servers.
  • Scan for and remove suspicious email attachments; ensure the scanned attachment is its “true file type” (i.e., the extension matches the file header).
  • Monitor users’ web browsing habits; restrict access to sites with unfavorable content.
  • Exercise caution when using removable media (e.g., USB thumb drives, external drives, CDs).
  • Scan all software downloaded from the internet prior to executing.
  • Maintain situational awareness of the latest threats and implement appropriate Access Control Lists (ACLs). Sign up to receive CISA’s alerts on security topics and threats.
  • Sign up for CISA’s free vulnerability scanning and testing services to help organizations secure internet-facing systems from weak configuration and known vulnerabilities. Email vulnerability_info@cisa.dhs.gov to sign up. See https://www.cisa.gov/cyber-resource-hub for more information about vulnerability scanning and other CISA cybersecurity assessment services.

Resources

https://unit42.paloaltonetworks.com/cortex-xdr-detects-netsupport-manager-rat-campaign/
https://threatpost.com/netsupport-manager-rat-nortonlifelock-docs/153387/
https://www.zdnet.com/article/new-lokibot-trojan-malware-campaign-comes-disguised-as-a-popular-game-launcher/
https://www.trendmicro.com/vinfo/us/security/news/cybercrime-and-digital-threats/kovter-an-evolving-malware-gone-fileless
https://www.varonis.com/blog/what-is-mimikatz/

References

Revisions

  • June 30, 2020: Initial Version

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.

AA20-182A: EINSTEIN Data Trends – 30-day Lookback

This post was originally published on this site

Original release date: June 30, 2020

Summary

Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) analysts have compiled the top detection signatures that have been the most active over the month of May in our national Intrusion Detection System (IDS), known as EINSTEIN. This information is meant to give the reader a closer look into what analysts are seeing at the national level and provide technical details on some of the most active threats.

IDS is a network tool that uses sensors to monitor inbound and outbound traffic to search for any type of suspicious activity or known threats, alerting analysts when a specific traffic pattern matches with an associated threat. IDS allows users to deploy signatures on these boundary sensors to look for the specific pattern, or network indicator, associated with a known threat.

The EINSTEIN Program is an automated process for collecting, correlating, analyzing, and sharing computer security information across the federal civilian government. By collecting information from participating federal government agencies, CISA builds and enhances our Nation’s cyber-related situational awareness.

The signatures CISA created have been included below for analysts across various organizations to use in enhancing their own network defenses. Note: CISA has created and tested these signatures in an environment that might not be the same for all organizations, so administrators may need to make changes or updates before using in the following signatures in their local environments.

Technical Details

Note: the below Snort signatures accounted for over 90 percent of what CISA analysts identified as potential threats using the IDS system for detection.

1. NetSupport Manager RAT

Description

The NetSupport Manager Remote Access Tool (RAT) is a legitimate program that, once installed on a victim’s machine, allows remote administrative control. In a malicious context, it can—among many other functions—be used to steal information. Malicious RATs can be difficult to detect because they do not normally appear in lists of running programs, and they can mimic the behavior of legitimate applications.

Examples

In January 2020, Palo Alto researchers observed the abuse of NetSupport in targeted phishing email campaigns.[1] In November 2019, Zscaler researchers observed “software update-themed” campaigns tricking users into installing a malicious NetSupport Manager RAT.[2] The earliest malicious use of NetSupport was seen in a phishing email campaign—reported by FireEye researchers in April 2018.[3]

Snort Signature

alert tcp any any -> any $HTTP_PORTS (msg:"NetSupportManager:HTTP Client Header contains 'User-Agent|3a 20|NetSupport Manager/'"; flow:established,to_server; flowbits:isnotset,.tagged; content:"User-Agent|3a 20|NetSupport Manager/"; http_header; fast_pattern:only; content:"CMD="; nocase; http_client_body; depth:4; content:"POST"; nocase; http_method; flowbits:set,.; classtype:http-header; reference:url,unit42.paloaltonetworks.com/cortex-xdr-detects-netsupport-manager-rat-campaign/; reference:url,www.pentestpartners.com/security-blog/how-to-reverse-engineer-a-protocol/; reference:url,github.com/silence-is-best/c2db;

2. Kovter

Description

Kovter is a fileless Trojan with several variants. This malware started as ransomware that malicious actors used to trick victims into thinking that they need to pay their local police a fine. Cyber actors have also used Kovter to perform click-fraud operations to infect targets and send stolen information from the target machines to command and control servers. Kovter’s evolving features have allowed this malware to rank among the Center for Internet Security’s most prolific malware year after year.[4] See CISA’s Webinar on Combatting Ransomware for additional information on Kovter.

Snort Signature

alert tcp any any -> any $HTTP_PORTS (msg:"Kovter:HTTP URI POST to CnC Server";; flow:established,to_server; flowbits:isnotset,.tagged; content:"POST / HTTP/1.1"; depth:15; content:"Content-Type|3a 20|application/x-www-form-urlencoded"; http_header; depth:47; fast_pattern; content:"User-Agent|3a 20|Mozilla/"; http_header; content:!"LOADCURRENCY"; nocase; content:!"Accept"; http_header; content:!"Referer|3a|"; http_header; content:!"Cookie|3a|"; nocase; http_header; pcre:"/^(?:[A-Za-z0-9+/]{4})*(?:[A-Za-z0-9+/]{2}==|[A-Za-z0-9+/]{3}=|[A-Za-z0-9+/]{4})$/P"; pcre:"/User-Agentx3a[^rn]+rnHostx3ax20(?:d{1,3}.){3}d{1,3}rnContent-Lengthx3ax20[1-5][0-9]{2,3}rn(?:Cache-Control|Pragma)x3a[^rn]+rn(?:rn)?$/H";; classtype:nonstd-tcp;; reference:url,www.malware-traffic-analysis.net/2017/06/29/index2.html;

3. XMRig

Description

XMRig is a type of cryptocurrency miner that uses the resources of an unsuspecting infected machine to mine Monero—a type of cryptocurrency. XMRig can cause a victim computer to overheat and perform poorly by using additional system resources that would otherwise not be active.

Snort Signature

alert tcp any any -> any !25 (msg:"XMRIG:Non-Std TCP Client Traffic contains JSONRPC 2.0 Config Data";; flow:established,to_server; flowbits:isnotset; content:"|22|jsonrpc|22 3a 22|2.0|22|"; distance:0; content:"|22|method|22 3a 22|login|22|"; distance:0; content:"|22|agent|22 3a 22|XMRig"; nocase; distance:0; fast_pattern; content:"libuv/"; nocase; distance:0; content:!"|22|login|22 3a 22|x|22|"; flowbits:set,; classtype:nonstd-tcp;; reference:url,malware-traffic-analysis.net/2017/11/12/index.html; reference:url,www.mysonicwall.com/sonicalert/searchresults.aspx?ev=article&id=1101;

Mitigations

CISA recommends using the following best practices to strengthen the security posture of an organization’s systems. Any configuration changes should be reviewed by system owners and administrators prior to implementation to avoid unwanted impacts.

  • Maintain up-to-date antivirus signatures and engines. See Protecting Against Malicious Code.
  • Ensure systems have the latest security updates. See Understanding Patches and Software Updates.
  • Disable file and printer sharing services. If these services are required, use strong passwords or Active Directory authentication.
  • Restrict users’ permissions to install and run unwanted software applications. Do not add users to the local administrators’ group unless required.
  • Enforce a strong password policy. See Choosing and Protecting Passwords.
  • Exercise caution when opening email attachments, even if the attachment is expected and the sender appears to be known. See Using Caution with Email Attachments.
  • Enable a personal firewall on agency workstations that is configured to deny unsolicited connection requests.
  • Disable unnecessary services on agency workstations and servers.
  • Scan for and remove suspicious email attachments; ensure the scanned attachment is its “true file type” (i.e., the extension matches the file header).
  • Monitor users’ web browsing habits; restrict access to sites with unfavorable content.
  • Exercise caution when using removable media (e.g., USB thumb drives, external drives, CDs).
  • Scan all software downloaded from the internet prior to executing.
  • Maintain situational awareness of the latest threats and implement appropriate Access Control Lists (ACLs). Sign up to receive CISA’s alerts on security topics and threats.
  • Sign up for CISA’s free vulnerability scanning and testing services to help organizations secure internet-facing systems from weak configuration and known vulnerabilities. Email vulnerability_info@cisa.dhs.gov to sign up. See https://www.cisa.gov/cyber-resource-hub for more information about vulnerability scanning and other CISA cybersecurity assessment services.

Resources

https://unit42.paloaltonetworks.com/cortex-xdr-detects-netsupport-manager-rat-campaign/
https://threatpost.com/netsupport-manager-rat-nortonlifelock-docs/153387/
https://www.zdnet.com/article/new-lokibot-trojan-malware-campaign-comes-disguised-as-a-popular-game-launcher/
https://www.trendmicro.com/vinfo/us/security/news/cybercrime-and-digital-threats/kovter-an-evolving-malware-gone-fileless
https://www.varonis.com/blog/what-is-mimikatz/

References

Revisions

  • June 30, 2020: Initial Version

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.