Wire self-paced learning platform is migrating to VMware Learning Zone

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Wire self-paced learning platform is migrating to VMware Learning Zone on the 20th Jan 2020.   The Wire platform was introduced over a year ago to help our partners access free enablement materials, it currently has over 2200 Cloud Provider contacts and contains 178 course modules in the main “VCPP Solution Enablement Learning Path” alone.

The post Wire self-paced learning platform is migrating to VMware Learning Zone appeared first on VMware Cloud Provider Blog.

WhiteCanyon VP Nathan Jones walks me through a live demo of WipeDrive using a VMware ESXi 6.7 VM in TinkerTry’s home lab!

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White Canyon Software has been in the business of certified drive wipes for over 21 years! It’s about time I had a look for myself, here’s their WipeDrive 9 Product Page.

Disclosure
This unpaid video demonstrates WipeDrive by WhiteCanyon. Note, WhiteCanyon has run an occasional ad on TinkerTry.com within the past year, but their product is consistent with the theme of my site and I reached out to them to do this video.

Some hurried home lab enthusiasts may find themselves doing a DBAN (Darik’s Boot and Nuke) to get a drive wipe done before disposal or resale, or even something a little more elegant like Parted Magic. But when it comes to doing some actual consulting, quick-and-dirty isn’t going to cut it. Let me explain.

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During my recent revisit to the federal sector last year, I spent considerable time in the DC area doing hands-on consulting again, much like I had done in the early 2000s. This experience got me thinking that it sure would be good to bone up on how a proper drive wipe is done these days, with all the right certification documentation to prove that it was done properly. I’ve had some experience with this at prior jobs where customers paid more to choose the drive retention option to never allow a drive out of the datacenter, or they’d just pay a consultant to do the drive wipes for them. What about if a consultant wants to do a drive wipe themselves?

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So I reached out to White Canyon and I got a rather quick response. The VP of Sales offered to go through the product with me, along with its positioning in the marketplace. We fired up a web meeting, I hit the record button, we introduced ourselves, and we got going with the demonstration. I quite enjoyed the whole experience, I hope you will too, when you watch the video below.

WIPEDRIVEinESXi-by-Paul-Braren-at-TinkerTry
ISO mounted in a VM, with an NVMe drive passed through. Unsupported but convenient.

I had this crazy idea that a little twist might be fun, and that figuring out if I could also get their product working not just when booted from an ISO, but also from a running VMware ESXi host. How? How about about SATA drive pass through for motherboards that support it, or in my particular configuration, NVMe pass through for the NVMe SSD I had on hand. For those interested, I’ve documented how that’s done here, and for this run, I chose these VM settings (way overkill) using just my ESXi 6.7 Update 3 home lab, a stock 8 core Supermicro SuperServer Bundle:

  • CPU 2
  • Memory 4 GB
  • Guest OS Linux
  • Guest OS Version Ubuntu Linux (64-bit)
  • CD/DVD drive 1 / Datastore ISO File / wd-enterprise-dongle.iso

While full access to the underlying hardware should be available when you pass through a drive using SATA passthrough, NVMe passthrough, or even RDM mappings, I’d recommend going with a fully supported native boot if you’re actually doing consulting, not just preparing for it. Yes, normal people would use a fully supported configuration, imagine that!

Activate-WipeDrive
ISO mounted via iKVM, a supported method of booting WipeDrive.

The process is something just like this:

  • Download latest wd-enterprise-dongle.iso
  • Use Rufus to create a bootable USB flash drive out of it
  • Shutdown the system
  • Insert the drives to wipe, and remove all others if you can, I used a Samsung 960 M.2 SSD to demonstrate
  • Power up, then choose F11 (or similar) for the one-time boot device selection, picking the USB drive
  • Alternatively, use something like iLO, iDRAC, or in Supermicro’s case, iKVM, to remotely mount the ISO that you’re booting from

Hopefully this video below gives you enough of a feel for the product that you might consider giving it a go for yourself. They are very fast at turning around key requests, and of course they handle secure locations where a local key (rather than cloud activation) is required.

Video

Screenshots

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WipeDrive9-no-return
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Disclosure
This unpaid video demonstrates WipeDrive by WhiteCanyon. Note, WhiteCanyon has run an occasional ad on TinkerTry.com within the past year, but their product is consistent with the theme of my site and I reached out to them to do this video.


See also at TinkerTry

how-to-configure-vmdirectpath-pass-through-of-nvme-using-vsphere-client

parted-magic-secure-erase-m2-nvme-update

See also

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  • WipeDrive Enterprise Free Trial

    When you submit this form, our representatives will contact you to learn more about your company’s needs. If your contact information is invalid, we will not be able to contact you about the trial.

How to configure Jumbo Frames not only for vSAN

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Not only vSAN but also vMotion, NFS and other types of traffic can benefit from Jumbo Frames configured on an ethernet network as the network traffic should consume fewer CPU cycles and achieve higher throughput.

Jumbo Frames must be configured end-to-end, therefore we should start the configuration in the network core on Physical Switches, then continue to Virtual Switches and finish on

vSphere 6.7 support backup over SMB

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Since vSphere 6.7 U2 SMB protocol was introduced to allow you to backup to a file share. This was excellent news for us and I decided to test it and see how it works. Upon setting up the backup schedule I got this error 

So I attempted to use the option to do a one off “Backup” and you get this message instead

Both messages didn’t really point me to any particular direction so I did a quick search on VMwares knowledge base and found an article KB70646 which states that it is only supported for SMB1 and currently it is still not fixed in U3 (Tested on Build number 15132721) either.  We all know SMB1 is insecure and shouldn’t be using it but I still wanted to try and see how it worked so first I enabled SMB 1 on my server. For reference of the powershell cmdlets to run go to this Microsoft article which covers SMB1/2 and 3.


Once I had SMB 1 enabled I attempted to set the backup schedule and as I was filling in the “Backup server credentials” section I was expecting to include my domain name such  “myvmxyungk” or “yungk@myvmx.local” for the “user name” as the share I created was using AD permissions to control access. Using either of the format was giving me the same error messages as above and  it appears that the only way it worked was to just use the account name i.e “yungk” which work immediately.

It’s not ideal to use SMB to do your VCSA backup yet unless you are willing to use SMB 1 protocol which I am pretty sure you would have your security team knocking on your door tell you to not use it. 





Announcing General Availability of VMware Cloud…

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Announcing General Availability of VMware Cloud… By: Lavanya Shastri On January 14th 2020, VMware achieved general availability of VMware Cloud Foundation (VCF) 3.9.1, introducing support for Application Virtual Networks, API support for multiple physical NICs and vSphere Distributed switches, and improvements to Cloud Builder and Developer Center. The following post provides an overview of the […]

Announcing General Availability of VMware Cloud…

This post was originally published on this site

Announcing General Availability of VMware Cloud… By: Lavanya Shastri On January 14th 2020, VMware achieved general availability of VMware Cloud Foundation (VCF) 3.9.1, introducing support for Application Virtual Networks, API support for multiple physical NICs and vSphere Distributed switches, and improvements to Cloud Builder and Developer Center. The following post provides an overview of the […]

Announcing General Availability of VMware Cloud…

This post was originally published on this site

Announcing General Availability of VMware Cloud… By: Lavanya Shastri On January 14th 2020, VMware achieved general availability of VMware Cloud Foundation (VCF) 3.9.1, introducing support for Application Virtual Networks, API support for multiple physical NICs and vSphere Distributed switches, and improvements to Cloud Builder and Developer Center. The following post provides an overview of the […]

Updating the VMware Cloud Director 10.0 Appliance and Other Tidbits

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In this blog post, I am going to review the process of updating a VMware Cloud Director (VCD) virtual appliance along with a quick walkthrough of this 10.0.0.1 patch release. Yesterday, we released our first 10.0 patch – release notes here. Please note that while we can upgrade via the VMware Update Repository, the 10.0.0.1 … Continue reading “Updating the VMware Cloud Director 10.0 Appliance and Other Tidbits”

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vSpeaking Podcast Ep 140: Back to Basics vSphere Networking

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Continuing the “Back to Basics” series, this week we welcome back GSS Escalation Engineer Broc Yanda to discuss vSphere networking. Broc explains how to get the best performance out of vSphere hosts networking, failover, and other common networking misconceptions. Follow Broc on twitter. Check out John and Broc’s VMworld session Top 10 things to know

The post vSpeaking Podcast Ep 140: Back to Basics vSphere Networking appeared first on Virtual Blocks.

Getting started with VCF Part 3 – vRealize Automation

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Continuing on my journey of ramping up on VMware Cloud Foundation (VCF), my next step is to go through the deployment of vRealize Automation. This is again done via the vRealize Suite Lifecycle Manager (vRSLM). We’ve already seen how to deploy out vRealize Operations through vRSLM in part 2. And in part 1, we saw the initial VCF management domain deployment. In this post we will take a detailed look at what needs to be put in place in order to be able to deploy vRealize Automation (vRA). Now, there are quite a number of prerequisites needed before we can…

The post Getting started with VCF Part 3 – vRealize Automation appeared first on CormacHogan.com.