Special Webcast: Easing Into Consulting; Consulting on The Side & Other Approaches – September 20, 2019 10:30am US/Eastern

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Speakers: Ted Demopoulos

Many people want to consultant so they can choose their work, have more freedom, and have more opportunities to make great money. Yet many never start or start late.

My friend Calvin started consulting 30 years after he planned to; in his retirement. He wishes he had started earlier. I know many others who have been planning, perhaps wishing or dreaming are better descriptions, to start for years without any progress on achieving their wishes and dreams!

Infosec consulting is a 16 billion dollar industry and growing & there are lots of opportunities.

You do NOT need to dive in by immediately quitting your job; there are other approaches. There are simple concrete things you can do to create great opportunities in consulting and to be ready when they happen while fully employed! You can take significant baby steps.

One approach is to make yourself look like the great and hirable person you are to potential clients and look for a large consulting gig before you jump.

Another approach is to consult on the side in addition to your regular job. This can be straightforward or complex, and in a surprising number of jobs it is not only possible, but sometimes your employer may actually encourage it. Other times your employer may be more restrictive yet there are often still plenty of opportunities.

In this Webcast we will look at options for moving into consulting while minimizing the risk of immediately jumping in. Plenty of case studies of people like you who have been there and are consulting today are included!

Special Webcast: Hacking Your Way to Business Knowledge – September 20, 2019 3:30pm US/Eastern

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Speakers: Kevin Garvey

While many IT security practitioners focus on honing in on their craft, there is a key component that should be on any practitioner’s radar: What? What are protecting each day for our company? Understanding the underpinnings of the business you work for is imperative understanding why you do what you do at your company. In this webinar, we will discuss the benefits of having a deep understanding of the business, how you can gain a better understanding of the business and how you can tie it back to your roles as security practitioners.

Special Webcast: Live Webinar: Micro-Segmentation for Network Security Strategy to Execution – September 19, 2019 10:30am US/Eastern

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Speakers: Dave Shackleford and Avishai Wool

Organizations heavily invest in a mix of security solutions to keep their networks safe, but still struggle to close the security gaps. Micro-segmentation helps protect the organizations network against the lateral movement of malware and minimizes the risk of insider threats. Micro-segmentation has received lots of attention as a possible solution, but many IT security professionals arent sure where to begin or what approach to take.

Dave Shackleford, the owner and principal consultant of Voodoo Security and a SANS analyst hosts Professor Avishai Wool, AlgoSecs CTO and co-founder, in this practical webinar to unveil why organizations are increasingly micro-segmenting for their networks, and guide you through each stage of a micro-segmentation project from development of the correct micro-segmentation strategy to effective implementation and maintenance of a micro-segmented network.

Register now to this live webinar to learn:

  • What micro-segmentation is
  • Why and how micro-segmentation can be part of the equation in protecting your network.
  • Common pitfalls in microsegmentation projects and how to avoid them.
  • The stages of a successful microsegmentation project.
  • How to monitor and maintain your micro-segmented network.
  • The role of policy management, change management, and automation in micro-segmentation.

Special Webcast: Yes, IT and OT Are Converging. So How Does This Affect Compliance? – September 19, 2019 3:30pm US/Eastern

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Speakers: Brandon Workentin

Refreshing compliance strategy for the age of IT-OT convergence challenges cybersecurity stakeholders across the functional spectrum, from CISOs to plant managers. In this webinar, we will explore popular frameworks that help reduce cyber risk, as well as how organizations can streamline regulatory and compliance efforts with better processes and the right technology.

Attendees will walk away with an understanding of key frameworks and standards, and the best practices for implementing them, including:

  • The NIST Cybersecurity Framework
  • NIST 800-53
  • The NERC CIP Regulations

DSC Resource Kit Release September 2019

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We just released the DSC Resource Kit!

This release includes updates to 15 DSC resource modules. In the past 6 weeks, 160 pull requests have been merged and 68 issues have been closed, all thanks to our amazing community!

The modules updated in this release are:

  • ActiveDirectoryCSDsc 4.1.0.0
  • ActiveDirectoryDsc 4.1.0.0
  • ComputerManagementDsc 7.0.0.0
  • DFSDsc 4.4.0.0
  • NetworkingDsc 7.4.0.0
  • SecurityPolicyDsc 2.10.0.0
  • SqlServerDsc 13.2.0.0
  • xDnsServer 1.15.0.0
  • xExchange 1.29.0.0
  • xFailOverCluster 1.13.0.0
  • xPSDesiredStateConfiguration 8.10.0.0
  • xRemoteDesktopSessionHost 1.9.0.0
  • xSCSMA 2.1.0.0
  • xWebAdministration 2.8.0.0

For a detailed list of the resource modules and fixes in this release, see the Included in this Release section below.

Our latest community call for the DSC Resource Kit was last Wednesday, September 11. A recording of the call is posted on the PowerShell YouTube channel. You can join us for the next call at 12PM (Pacific time) on August 28th to ask questions and give feedback about your experience with the DSC Resource Kit.

The next DSC Resource Kit release will be on Wednesday, October 9.

We strongly encourage you to update to the newest version of all modules using the PowerShell Gallery, and don’t forget to give us your feedback in the comments below, on GitHub, or on Twitter (@PowerShell_Team)!

Please see our documentation here for information on the support of these resource modules.

Included in this Release

You can see a detailed summary of all changes included in this release in the table below. For past release notes, go to the README.md or CHANGELOG.md file on the GitHub repository page for a specific module (see the How to Find DSC Resource Modules on GitHub section below for details on finding the GitHub page for a specific module).

Module Name Version Release Notes
ActiveDirectoryCSDsc 4.1.0.0
  • AdcsCertificationAuthoritySettings:
    • Fix grammar in the resource README.md.
  • Fix minor style issues in statement case.
ActiveDirectoryDsc 4.1.0.0
    • We could not add the change log to the release notes due to the length of the change log. What have change in this release can be found here

https://github.com/PowerShell/ActiveDirectoryDsc/blob/dev/CHANGELOG.md#4100

    .
ComputerManagementDsc 7.0.0.0
  • ScheduledTask:
    • Better compatibility with Group LogonType when passing BuiltIn groups through ExecuteAsCredential
      • Primary use case is “BUILTINUsers”
      • Use the ExecuteAsCredential property to pass the username The PSCredential needs a non-null that is ignored
    • Delay property not handled properly on AtLogon and AtStartup trigger – Fixes Issue 230
    • Changed Get-ScheduledTask calls to ScheduledTasksGet-ScheduledTask to avoid name clash with Carbon module. Fixes Issue 248
    • Cast MultipleInstances value returned by Get-TargetResource to string – fixes Issue 255
  • PendingReboot:
    • Migrated xPendingReboot from xPendingReboot and renamed to PendingReboot.
    • Converted to meet HQRM guidelines – Fixes Issue 12.
    • Changed SkipCcmClientSDK parameter to default to $true – Fixes Issue 13.
    • Fixed Test-TargetResource so that if ConfigMgr requires a reboot then the pending reboot will be set – Fixes Issue 26.
    • Refactored Test-TargetResource to reduce code duplication and move to a data driven design.
    • Refactored Get-TargetResource by adding a new function Get-PendingRebootState so that Test-TargetResource no longer needed to use Get-TargetResource. This eliminated the need to include write parameters in Get-TargetResource.
    • Converted the call to Invoke-WmiMethod to Invoke-CimMethod.
    • Deleted the code that removes the regRebootLocations variable at the end of the resource as it appears to serve no purpose.
  • Correct all tests to meet Pester 4.0 standards.
  • RemoteDesktopAdmin:
    • New resource for configuring Remote Desktop for Administration – fixes Issue 224.
  • Updated common function Test-DscParameterState to support ordered comparison of arrays by copying function and tests from NetworkingDsc – fixes Issue 250.
  • BREAKING CHANGE: ScheduledTask:
    • Correct output type of DaysInterval,StartTime,WeeksDaysOfWeek, and WeeksInterval parameters from Get-TargetResource to match MOF.
    • Refactored Get-TargetResource to remove parameters that are not key or required – fixes Issue 249.
    • Added function Test-DateStringContainsTimeZone to determine if a string containing a date time includes a time zone.
    • Enable verbose preference to be passed through to Test-DscParameterState.
    • Changed Test-TargetResource so that StartTime is only compared for trigger types Daily,Weekly or Once.
  • Fix minor style issues in statement case.
DFSDsc 4.4.0.0
  • Fix example publish to PowerShell Gallery by adding gallery_api environment variable to AppVeyor.yml – fixes Issue 91.
  • Fix minor style issues in statement case.
NetworkingDsc 7.4.0.0
  • Added Comment Based Help for New-NotImplementedException common function – fixes Issue 411.
  • Added common function “Format-Win32NetworkADapterFilterByNetConnectionID” to properly accept wild cards for Win32_NetworkAdapter filters.
  • Updated MSFT_Netbios to use “Format-Win32NetworkADapterFilterByNetConnectionID”
  • Corrected minor style and consistency issues in NetworkingDsc.Common.tests.ps1 and NetworkingDsc.Common.ps1.
  • Changed verbose messages in Test-DscParameterState to include full type name.
  • Fixed bug in Test-DscParameterState that causes it to return true when both the current array and desired array is empty.
  • Fix minor style issues in statement case.
SecurityPolicyDsc 2.10.0.0
  • Changes to SecurityPolicyDsc
    • Opt-in to the following DSC Resource Common Meta Tests:
      • Common Tests – Validate Module Files
      • Common Tests – Validate Script Files
      • Common Tests – Validate Markdown Files
      • Common Tests – Required Script Analyzer Rules
      • Common Tests – Flagged Script Analyzer Rules
      • Common Tests – New Error-Level Script Analyzer Rules
      • Common Tests – Custom Script Analyzer Rules
      • Common Tests – Validate Markdown Links
      • Common Tests – Relative Path Length
      • Common Tests – Validate Example Files
      • Common Tests – Validate Example Files To Be Published
    • Fix keywords to lower-case to align with guideline.
SqlServerDsc 13.2.0.0
  • Changes to SqlServerDsc
    • Fix keywords to lower-case to align with guideline.
    • Fix keywords to have space before a parenthesis to align with guideline.
xDnsServer 1.15.0.0
xExchange 1.29.0.0
  • Enable Script Analyzer default rules
  • Fixed keywords in upper case
xFailOverCluster 1.13.0.0
  • Updated the xCluster test method to return true if a node is joined to the cluster but is in a Paused state.
xPSDesiredStateConfiguration 8.10.0.0
  • Changes to xPSDesiredStateConfiguration
    • Fix keywords to lower-case to align with guideline.
  • Added SMB PullServer support for publishing.
xRemoteDesktopSessionHost 1.9.0.0
  • Changes to xRDRemoteApp
    • Fixing typo in parameter name when calling the function ValidateCustomModeParameters (issue 50).
  • Changes to xRDSessionDeployment
    • When RDMS service does not exist the Get-TargetResource will no longer throw an error (issue 47).
  • Rename Tests/Unit folder to use upper case on first letter.
  • Update appveyor.yml to use the default template.
  • Added default template files .codecov.yml, .gitattributes, and .gitignore, and .vscode folder.
  • xRDSessionCollectionConfiguration:
    • Changed CollectionName variable validation max length to 256
  • xRDSessionCollection
    • Changed CollectionName variable validation max length to 256
  • xRDRemoteApp
    • Changed CollectionName variable validation max length to 256
xSCSMA 2.1.0.0
  • Update appveyor.yml to use the default template.
  • Added default template files .codecov.yml, .gitattributes, and .gitignore, and .vscode folder.
  • Closed issue 29 – Web bindings fail due to hardcoded WSE
  • Switched from Get-WmiObject Win32_Product to Get-ItemProperty for identifer number
xWebAdministration 2.8.0.0
  • Fix multiple HTTPS bindings on one xWebsite receiving the first binding”s certificate 332
    • Added unit regression test
  • Changes to xWebsite
    • Added ServerAutoStart (controls website autostart) and changed documentation for ServiceAutoStartEnabled (controls application auto-initialization). Fixes 325.
    • Fix multiple HTTPS bindings on one xWebsite receiving the first binding”s certificate 332
      • Added unit regression test
    • Changes to xWebAppPool
      • Fix false Test-TargetResource failure for logEventOnRecycle if items in the Configuration property are specified in a different order than IIS natively stores them 434
    • Changes to xIisModule
      • Fixed the parameters specification for the internal Get-IISHandler and Remove-IISHandler function

How to Find Released DSC Resource Modules

To see a list of all released DSC Resource Kit modules, go to the PowerShell Gallery and display all modules tagged as DSCResourceKit. You can also enter a module’s name in the search box in the upper right corner of the PowerShell Gallery to find a specific module.

Of course, you can also always use PowerShellGet (available starting in WMF 5.0) to find modules with DSC Resources:

# To list all modules that tagged as DSCResourceKit
Find-Module -Tag DSCResourceKit 
# To list all DSC resources from all sources 
Find-DscResource

Please note only those modules released by the PowerShell Team are currently considered part of the ‘DSC Resource Kit’ regardless of the presence of the ‘DSC Resource Kit’ tag in the PowerShell Gallery.

To find a specific module, go directly to its URL on the PowerShell Gallery:
http://www.powershellgallery.com/packages/< module name >
For example:
http://www.powershellgallery.com/packages/xWebAdministration

How to Install DSC Resource Modules From the PowerShell Gallery

We recommend that you use PowerShellGet to install DSC resource modules:

Install-Module -Name < module name >

For example:

Install-Module -Name xWebAdministration

To update all previously installed modules at once, open an elevated PowerShell prompt and use this command:

Update-Module

After installing modules, you can discover all DSC resources available to your local system with this command:

Get-DscResource

How to Find DSC Resource Modules on GitHub

All resource modules in the DSC Resource Kit are available open-source on GitHub.
You can see the most recent state of a resource module by visiting its GitHub page at:
https://github.com/PowerShell/< module name >
For example, for the CertificateDsc module, go to:
https://github.com/PowerShell/CertificateDsc.

All DSC modules are also listed as submodules of the DscResources repository in the DscResources folder and the xDscResources folder.

How to Contribute

You are more than welcome to contribute to the development of the DSC Resource Kit! There are several different ways you can help. You can create new DSC resources or modules, add test automation, improve documentation, fix existing issues, or open new ones.
See our contributing guide for more info on how to become a DSC Resource Kit contributor.

If you would like to help, please take a look at the list of open issues for the DscResources repository.
You can also check issues for specific resource modules by going to:
https://github.com/PowerShell/< module name >/issues
For example:
https://github.com/PowerShell/xPSDesiredStateConfiguration/issues

Your help in developing the DSC Resource Kit is invaluable to us!

Questions, comments?

If you’re looking into using PowerShell DSC, have questions or issues with a current resource, or would like a new resource, let us know in the comments below, on Twitter (@PowerShell_Team), or by creating an issue on GitHub.

Michael Greene
Principal Program Manager
PowerShell DSC Team
@migreene (Twitter)
@mgreenegit (GitHub)

The post DSC Resource Kit Release September 2019 appeared first on PowerShell.

PowerShell 7 Preview 4

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We continue to make progress towards our PowerShell 7 release which currently is targeting December 2019 for a Release Candidate and January 2020 for General Availability and will be our first LTS (Long Term Servicing) release!

Please see the previous blog post on Preview 3 for more details about LTS and also Windows PowerShell compatibility.

Preview 4 contains a number of bug fixes, but also new features which I’ll cover in this blog post.

New Features in Preview 4

This is just a small part of the entire changelog. New experimental features in this preview from the community and also the PowerShell team:

Ternary Operator

The ternary operator is popular among C# developers due to its terseness which can improve readability if you are familiar with this operator.

This operator is completely opt-in so if you prefer to use if..else instead, you can certainly continue to do that.

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Start-Job -WorkingDirectory

Those of you familiar with the Start-Job cmdlet will have encountered that the new PowerShell process started to handle the job will have different working directory on Windows PowerShell and PowerShell Core and it can sometimes be not what you expected. This parameter was added to allow you to specify the working directory of the new job process before your script block runs!

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$ErrorActionPreference = “Break”

This feature comes from a well known PowerShell MVP Kirk Munro. Basically, if you set $ErrorActionPreference to Break, then when there is an error it will drop you into the debugger immediately!

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Invoke-DscResource

With this change, you can now leverage DSC Resources while by-passing the LCM (Local Configuration Manager). This means that you can author your own LCM or simply leverage existing DSC Resources within your scripts and this also works cross platform!

Note that binary DSC Resources are not supported!

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DSC Configuration Compilation

Previously if you authored a DSC Configuration script, you would need to use a Windows machine to compile it to a mof file to deploy onto your managed node. Starting with Preview4, you can now perform DSC compilation on non-Windows systems.

Note that this is work in progress with some known issues.

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Testing the MSIX package

Recently, we started publishing a MSIX package for Windows. This will eventually allow us to publish PowerShell 7 to the Windows Store. For now, if you wish to try out this package, you must be in Developer Mode and use Add-AppxPackage to install it. Double clicking it from the Windows Shell will not allow you to install the developer signed package.

Closing

Although this blog post focuses on new features, this release also contains many bug fixes as well as targeted performance improvements.

You can always get the latest version of PowerShell from https://aka.ms/get-powershell.

Expect more new features from the community and the PowerShell team in future Preview releases!

Steve Lee
PowerShell Team

The post PowerShell 7 Preview 4 appeared first on PowerShell.

Special Webcast: Modern Threat Hunting And Response: How TTPs Are Changing The Game – September 19, 2019 1:00pm US/Eastern

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Speakers: Orion Cassetto and Trevor Daughney

Lead your team’s search to uncover modern attacks by detecting and responding to common tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs) used by attackers. This live webinar includes: a discussion exploring the evolution of threat hunting from focusing on Indicators of Compromise (IoCs) to TTPs and an overview of the MITRE ATT&CK framework and how to use it. You will leave this webinar more knowledgeable about how to uncover the entirety of attacks by focusing on TTPs, rather than simply stringing together the artifacts and IoCs, and how ATT&CK can be leveraged in the process.

Analyst Webcast: Elevating Enterprise Security with Fidelis Cybersecurity: Network and Deception – September 17, 2019 1:00pm US/Eastern

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Speakers: Matt Bromiley and Gerald Mancini

Securing a modern global enterprise is not easy by any stretch of the imagination. The list of technologies and requirements that contribute to the networks of large organizations are sometimes mind-boggling: cloud computing, on-premises systems, mobile workers, diverse data privacy regulations and laws, and cross-platform device support, to name a few. Over the past few years, these complexities have continued to drive one core concept: Security teams cannot defend complex networks without holistic, correlative insight into the environment.

In this first part of a two-part review, Matt Bromiley reviews CommandPost, part of Fidelis Elevate platform, with respect to its ability to provide insight into network traffic, threats, deception and endpoint activity. At this webcast, attendees will learn how Fidelis Network and Deception enables:

  • Holistic visibility into network activity
  • Focused investigations
  • Deception techniques

Register today to be among the first to receive the associated whitepaper written by incident investigator and SANS instructor/analyst Matt Bromiley.

Click here to register for the second part of this two-part review, Elevating Enterprise Security with Fidelis Cybersecurity: Endpoint Security Capabilities, on Monday, September 23 at 1 PM Eastern, to learn how to monitor endpoint behavior activity by using the same Fidelis Elevate platform.

Analyst Webcast: Elevating Enterprise Security with Fidelis Cybersecurity: CommandPost and Deception – September 17, 2019 1:00pm US/Eastern

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Speakers: Matt Bromiley and Gerald Mancini

Securing a modern global enterprise is not easy by any stretch of the imagination. The list of technologies and requirements that contribute to the networks of large organizations are sometimes mind-boggling: cloud computing, on-premises systems, mobile workers, diverse data privacy regulations and laws, and cross-platform device support, to name a few. Over the past few years, these complexities have continued to drive one core concept: Security teams cannot defend complex networks without holistic, correlative insight into the environment.

In this first part of a two-part review, Matt Bromiley reviews CommandPost, part of Fidelis’ Elevate platform, with respect to its ability to provide insight into network traffic, threats, deception and endpoint activity. At this webcast, attendees will learn how CommandPost enables:

  • Holistic visibility into network activity
  • Focused investigations
  • Deception techniques

Register today to be among the first to receive the associated whitepaper written by incident investigator and SANS instructor/analyst Matt Bromiley.

Click here to register for the second part of this two-part review, Elevating Enterprise Security with Fidelis Cybersecurity: Endpoint Security Capabilities, on Monday, September 23 at 1 PM Eastern, to learn how to monitor endpoint behavior activity by using the same Fidelis Elevate platform.

NoSQL Workbench for Amazon DynamoDB – Available in Preview

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I am always impressed by the flexibility of Amazon DynamoDB, providing our customers a fully-managed key-value and document database that can easily scale from a few requests per month to millions of requests per second.

The DynamoDB team released so many great features recently, from on-demand capacity, to support for native ACID transactions. Here’s a great recap of other recent DynamoDB announcements such as global tables, point-in-time recovery, and instant adaptive capacity. DynamoDB now encrypts all customer data at rest by default.

However, switching mindset from a relational database to NoSQL is not that easy. Last year we had two amazing talks at re:Invent that can help you understand how DynamoDB works, and how you can use it for your use cases:

To help you even further, we are introducing today in preview NoSQL Workbench for Amazon DynamoDB, a free, client-side application available for Windows and macOS to help you design and visualize your data model, run queries on your data, and generate the code for your application!

The three main capabilities provided by the NoSQL Workbench are:

  • Data modeler — to build new data models, adding tables and indexes, or to import, modify, and export existing data models.
  • Visualizer — to visualize data models based on their applications access patterns, with sample data that you can add manually or import via a SQL query.
  • Operation builder — to define and execute data-plane operations or generate ready-to-use sample code for them.

To see how this new tool can simplify working with DynamoDB, let’s build an application to retrieve information on customers and their orders.

Using the NoSQL Workbench
In the Data modeler, I start by creating a CustomerOrders data model, and I add a table, CustomerAndOrders, to hold my customer data and the information on their orders. You can use this tool to create a simple data model where customers and orders are in two distinct tables, each one with their own primary keys. There would be nothing wrong with that. Here I’d like to show how this tool can also help you use more advanced design patterns. By having the customer and order data in a single table, I can construct queries that return all the data I need with a single interaction with DynamoDB, speeding up the performance of my application.

As partition key, I use the customerId. This choice provides an even distribution of data across multiple partitions. The sort key in my data model will be an overloaded attribute, in the sense that it can hold different data depending on the item:

  • A fixed string, for example customer, for the items containing the customer data.
  • The order date, written using ISO 8601 strings such as 20190823, for the items containing orders.

By overloading the sort key with these two possible values, I am able to run a single query that returns the customer data and the most recent orders. For this reason, I use a generic name for the sort key. In this case, I use sk.

Apart from the partition key and the optional sort key, DynamoDB has a flexible schema, and the other attributes can be different for each item in a table. However, with this tool I have the option to describe in the data model all the possible attributes I am going to use for a table. In this way, I can check later that all the access patterns I need for my application work well with this data model.

For this table, I add the following attributes:

  • customerName and customerAddress, for the items in the table containing customer data.
  • orderId and deliveryAddress, for the items in the table containing order data.

I am not adding a orderDate attribute, because for this data model the value will be stored in the sk sort key. For a real production use case, you would probably have much more attributes to describe your customers and orders, but I am trying to keep things simple enough here to show what you can do, without getting lost in details.

Another access pattern for my application is to be able to get a specific order by ID. For that, I add a global secondary index to my table, with orderId as partition key and no sort key.

I add the table definition to the data model, and move on to the Visualizer. There, I update the table by adding some sample data. I add data manually, but I could import a few rows from a table in a MySQL database, for example to simplify a NoSQL migration from a relational database.

Now, I visualize my data model with the sample data to have a better understanding of what to expect from this table. For example, if I select a customerId, and I query for all the orders greater than a specific date, I also get the customer data at the end, because the string customer, stored in the sk sort key, is always greater that any date written in ISO 8601 syntax.

In the Visualizer, I can also see how the global secondary index on the orderId works. Interestingly, items without an orderId are not part of this index, so I get only 4 of the 6 items that are part of my sample data. This happens because DynamoDB writes a corresponding index entry only if the index sort key value is present in the item. If the sort key doesn’t appear in every table item, the index is said to be sparseSparse indexes are useful for queries over a subsection of a table.

I now commit my data model to DynamoDB. This step creates server-side resources such as tables and global secondary indexes for the selected data model, and loads the sample data. To do so, I need AWS credentials for an AWS account. I have the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) installed and configured in the environment where I am using this tool, so I can just select one of my named profiles.

I move to the Operation builder, where I see all the tables in the selected AWS Region. I select the newly created CustomerAndOrders table to browse the data and build the code for the operations I need in my application.

In this case, I want to run a query that, for a specific customer, selects all orders more recent that a date I provide. As we saw previously, the overloaded sort key would also return the customer data as last item. The Operation builder can help you use the full syntax of DynamoDB operations, for example adding conditions and child expressions. In this case, I add the condition to only return orders where the deliveryAddress contains Seattle.

I have the option to execute the operation on the DynamoDB table, but this time I want to use the query in my application. To generate the code, I select between Python, JavaScript (Node.js), or Java.

You can use the Operation builder to generate the code for all the access patterns that you plan to use with your application, using all the advanced features that DynamoDB provides, including ACID transactions.

Available Now
You can find how to set up NoSQL Workbench for Amazon DynamoDB (Preview) for Windows and macOS here.

We welcome your suggestions in the DynamoDB discussion forum. Let us know what you build with this new tool and how we can help you more!