Copying files and directories from one datastore to another ?

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I have been searching for a while for very simple script to copy all folders and their content from one datastore to another datastore.

These are not VM’s so vmotion is not an option as far as I know. These are OVA files and ISO files in their own folders and misc. files of that sort. No running VM’s.

 

Found this:

Managing the VMware datastore with PowerCLI (PowerShell) – 4sysops
But ideally I would like this to run all without using PSDrive so my workstation is not involved in moves at all.

 

One would think this is an easy task but the more I search for a simple script the harder the problem gets.

 

Any suggestions on this?

Sound breaking really bad after update but video is better!!

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After the last update I noticed an improvement on video quality and performance since it runs with Hyper-V features now, specially in Windows XP, I remember video was laggy, but after the update is better!!, but now SOUND in many Windows OS is breaking a lot, and suddenly I get a message saying “sorry but audio will be now disconnected” I hope you can make a follow up on this

New – SaaS Contract Upgrades and Renewals for AWS Marketplace

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AWS Marketplace currently contains over 7,500 listings from 1,500 independent software vendors (ISVs). You can browse the digital catalog to find, test, buy, and deploy software that runs on AWS:

Each ISV sets the pricing model and prices for their software. There are a variety of options available, including free trials, hourly or usage-based pricing, monthly, annual AMI pricing, and up-front pricing for 1-, 2-, and 3-year contracts. These options give each ISV the flexibility to define the models that work best for their customers. If their offering is delivered via a Software as a Service (SaaS) contract model, the seller can define the usage categories, dimensions, and contract length.

Upgrades & Renewals
AWS customers that make use of the SaaS and usage-based products that they find in AWS Marketplace generally start with a small commitment and then want to upgrade or renew them early as their workloads expand.

Today we are making the process of upgrading and renewing these contracts easier than ever before. While the initial contract is still in effect, buyers can communicate with sellers to negotiate a new Private Offer that best meets their needs. The offer can include additional entitlements to use the product, pricing discounts, a payment schedule, a revised contract end-date, and changes to the end-user license agreement (EULA), all in accord with the needs of a specific buyer.

Once the buyer accepts the offer, the new terms go in to effect immediately. This new, streamlined process means that sellers no longer need to track parallel (paper and digital) contracts, and also ensures that buyers receive continuous service.

Let’s say I am already using a product from AWS Marketplace and negotiate an extended contract end-date with the seller. The seller creates a Private Offer for me and sends me a link that I follow in order to find & review it:

I select the Upgrade offer, and I can see I have a new contract end date, the number of dimensions on my upgrade contract, and the payment schedule. I click Upgrade current contract to proceed:

I confirm my intent:

And I am good to go:

This feature is available to all buyers & SaaS sellers, and applies to SaaS contracts and contracts with consumption pricing.

Jeff;

iSCSI vs NFS

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Hi

 

VMware has not released this paper’s new version since 2012 – https://www.vmware.com/content/dam/digitalmarketing/vmware/en/pdf/techpaper/storage_protocol_comparison-white-paper.pdf 

 

I went though some old post & got sense from all that NFS is better for below reasons

 

1. Easy Setup

2. Easy to expand

3. UNMAP is advantage on iSCSI

4. VMFS is quite fragile if you use Thin provisioned VMDKs. A single powerfailure can render a VMFS-volume unrecoverable.

5. NFS datastores immediately show the benefits of storage efficiency (deduplication, compresson, thin provisioning) from both the NetApp and vSphere perspectives

6. Netapp specific : The NetApp NFS Plug-In for VMware is a plug-in for ESXi hosts that allows them to use VAAI features with NFS datastores on ONTAP

7. Netapp specific : NFS has autogrow

8. When using NFS datastores, space is reclaimed immediately when a VM is deleted

9. Performance is almost identical

 

Please list out if i miss anything & share comments

 

 

 

Thanks

AMD 2nd Gen EPYC (Rome) Application Performance on vSphere Series: Part 2 – VMmark

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In recently published benchmarks with VMware VMmark, we’ve seen lots of great results with the AMD EPYC 7002 Series (known as 2nd Gen EPYC, or “Rome”) by several of our partners. These results show how well a mixed workload environment with many virtual machines and infrastructure operations like vMotion can perform with new server platforms. This […]

The post AMD 2nd Gen EPYC (Rome) Application Performance on vSphere Series: Part 2 – VMmark appeared first on VMware VROOM! Blog.

Forrester Study: VMware Carbon Black Cloud Provides 379% ROI

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A newly published Forrester Consulting Total Economic Impact™ (TEI) study shows that organizations who replace their legacy endpoint security products with the VMware Carbon Black Cloud experience a 379% return on investment within three years. The commissioned study conducted on behalf of VMware also highlighted that, thanks to the easy cloud-based deployment, faster investigation and […]

The post Forrester Study: VMware Carbon Black Cloud Provides 379% ROI appeared first on VMware Carbon Black.

Using Velero to backup and restore applications that use vSAN File Service RWX file shares

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It has been a while since I looked at Velero, our backup and restore product for Kubernetes cluster resources. This morning I noticed that the Velero team just published version 1.4. This article uses the previous version of Velero, version is v1.3.2. The version should not make a difference to the article. In this post, I want to see Velero backing up and restoring applications that use read-write-many (RWX) volumes that are dynamically provisioned as file shares from vSAN 7.0 File Services. To demonstrate, I’ll create two simple busybox Pods in their own namespace. Using the vSphere CSI driver, Kubernetes…

The post Using Velero to backup and restore applications that use vSAN File Service RWX file shares appeared first on CormacHogan.com.

USB Redirection not working – MacOSX Catalina 15.10.4

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Problem: USB Redirection after upgrade to MacOSX Catalina 15.10.4 not working – “Error” No suitable USB devices available

 

MacOSX: 15.10.4

VMware View Client for Mac: v5.4.2

MacOSX Settings –> Security and privacy settings

  • Tab Firewall: Firewall is off
  • Tab Privacy
    • Accessibility: VMware Horizon Client is ticked
    • Disk Access: VMware Horizon Client is ticked
    • Files and Folders: VMware Horizon Client is listed with “Full Disk Access”

 

Local disks or usb drives can be mounted by VMware Horizon Preferences –> Sharing, but unfortunately this is not really a USB redirection

 

 

Any clues what could cause the problem?

 

Looks some other people struggeling with usb redirection too: VMWARE HORIZON and MAC CATALINA 10.15

VMware Case: 20123641005

New – AWS Amplify Libraries for Android and iOS

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When you develop mobile applications, you must develop a set of cloud-powered functionalities for each project. For example, most applications require user authentication or detailed in-app analytics. Your application most probably calls REST or GraphQL APIs and is required to support offline scenario and data synchronization. AWS Amplify makes it easy to integrate such functionalities in your mobile and web applications.

AWS Amplify is a set of tools and services for building secure, scalable mobile and web applications. It is made out of three components: an open source set of libraries and UI components for adding cloud-powered functionalities, a command line interactive toolchain to create and manage a cloud backend, and the AWS Amplify Console, an AWS Service to deploy and host full stack serverless web applications.

Today, I am happy to announce the availability of Amplify iOS and Amplify Android libraries and tools, to help mobile application developers to easily build secure and scalable cloud-powered applications.

Until today, when you developed a cloud-powered mobile application, you were using a combination of tools and SDKs: the Amplify CLI to create and manage your backend, and one or several AWS Mobile SDKs to access the backend. In general, AWS Mobile SDKs are low-level wrappers around the AWS Services APIs. They require you to understand the API details and, most of the time, to write many lines of undifferentiated code, such as object (de)serialization, error handling, etc.

Amplify iOS and Amplify Android simplify this. First, they provide native libraries oriented around use-cases, such as Authentication, Data storage and access, machine learning predictions etc. They provide a declarative interface that enables you to programmatically apply best practices with abstractions. Thinking in terms of use cases instead of AWS Services results in higher-level abstraction, faster development cycles, and fewer lines of code. Secondly, they provide tools that integrate with your native IDE toolchain: XCode for iOS and Gradle for Android.

Using Amplify iOS or Amplify Android is our recommended way to integrate a cloud-based backend in your mobile application.

How to get started?
I’ve built two simple mobile applications (one on iOS and one on Android) to show you how to get started. The sources for these examples are available on my GitHub. As you see, I am not a graphic designer. The applications have a list of UI buttons to trigger different flows and the results are only visible in the console.

Amplify iOS & Android Demo

Amplify libraries for mobile are organized around categories for Auth, API (REST and GraphQL), Analytics, File Storage, DataStore, and Predictions. In this example, I use three categories. Auth, to implement sign-in, sign-up, and Login with Facebook flow. DataStore to use a query-able, on-device persistent storage engine. It seamlessly synchronizes data between the app and the cloud with built-in versioning, conflict detection and resolution capabilities. I also use Predictions category to add automatic translation between english and french languages.

Let’s review the four main steps and lines of code to get started on each platform. For a detailed step-by-step tutorial, have a look at the Amplify iOS or Amplify Android documentation.

The first step is to set up your project, to add required dependencies and build steps.

On iOS, you add a couple of lines to your Podfile and add the AWS Amplify build script to the build phase of your project.
On Android, you do the same in your Gradle file for the module and for the app.

// iOS Podfile
target 'amplify-lib-ios-demo' do
  # Comment the next line if you don't want to use dynamic frameworks
  use_frameworks!

  # Pods for amplify-lib-ios-demo
    pod 'Amplify'
    pod 'Amplify/Tools'

    pod 'AmplifyPlugins/AWSAPIPlugin'
    pod 'AmplifyPlugins/AWSDataStorePlugin'
    pod 'AmplifyPlugins/AWSCognitoAuthPlugin'
    pod 'AWSPredictionsPlugin'
// Android build.gradle fragment (Module: app) 
...
compileOptions {
    sourceCompatibility JavaVersion.VERSION_1_8
    targetCompatibility JavaVersion.VERSION_1_8
}
dependencies {
    implementation 'com.amplifyframework:core:1.0.0'
    implementation 'com.amplifyframework:aws-datastore:1.0.0'
    implementation 'com.amplifyframework:aws-api:1.0.0'
    implementation 'com.amplifyframework:aws-predictions:1.0.0'
    implementation 'com.amplifyframework:aws-auth-cognito:1.0.0'
}
...
// Android build.gradle fragment (Project: My Application)
...
repositories {
    mavenCentral()
    google()
    jcenter()
}
dependencies {
        classpath 'com.amplifyframework:amplify-tools-gradle-plugin:1.0.0'
}
apply plugin: 'com.amplifyframework.amplifytools'
...

On iOS, you also must manually add an amplify-tools.sh to your build steps.

When this is done, you type pod install for iOS or you sync the project with Gradle.

The second step is to add the plugins for each category to Amplify at application initialization time. On iOS, I am using didFinishLaunchingWithOptions from the AppDelegate. On Android, I am using onCreate from MainActivity. You’re free to initialize Amplify at any stage in your app, it is not necessary to be at app startup time.

    // iOS AppDelegate class
    func application(_ application: UIApplication, didFinishLaunchingWithOptions launchOptions: [UIApplication.LaunchOptionsKey: Any]?) -> Bool {
        
        do {
            try Amplify.add(plugin: AWSAPIPlugin())
            try Amplify.add(plugin: AWSDataStorePlugin(modelRegistration: AmplifyModels()))
            try Amplify.add(plugin: AWSCognitoAuthPlugin())
            try Amplify.add(plugin: AWSPredictionsPlugin())
            
            try Amplify.configure()
            print("Amplify initialized")
        } catch {
            print("Failed to configure Amplify (error)")
        }
}
   // Android MainActivity class (Kotlin version)
   override fun onCreate(savedInstanceState: Bundle?) {
        // ...

        try {
            Amplify.addPlugin(AWSDataStorePlugin())
            Amplify.addPlugin(AWSApiPlugin())
            Amplify.addPlugin(AWSCognitoAuthPlugin())
            Amplify.addPlugin(AWSPredictionsPlugin())
            Amplify.configure(applicationContext)
            Log.i(TAG, "Initialized Amplify")
        } catch (error: AmplifyException) {
            Log.e(TAG, "Could not initialize Amplify", error)
        }
    }

The third step varies from one category to the other. Usually, it involves using the AWS Amplify command line to provision and configure your backend. Type commands like amplify add auth or amplify add predictions to configure a category.

For example, to configure the user authentication with Amazon Cognito and social identity providers, such as Login With Facebook, you type something like the below. This step is identical for iOS and Android as we are creating and configuring the cloud backend.

To learn how to configure single sign-on with social identity providers such as Facebook, Google or Amazon, you can refer to the step-by-step instructions I wrote in this Amplify iOS Workshop (I will update the workshop soon to take advantage of these new AWS Amplify libraries).

Configuring the DataStore involves creating a GraphQL schema for your data. Amplify generates native (Swift or Java) code to represent your data in your app. It transparently handles an offline datastore to store your data and sync them with the backend when network connectivity is available.

The fourth and last step is to actually invoke Amplify’s library code at runtime.

For example, to trigger an authentication using Amazon Cognito hosted web user interface, you use the following code:

// iOS (swift) in AppDelegate object
    func signIn() {
        _ = Amplify.Auth.signInWithWebUI(presentationAnchor: UIApplication.shared.windows.first!) { (result) in
            switch(result) {
                case .success(let result):
                    print(result)
                case .failure(let error):
                    print("Can not signin (error)")
            }
        }
    }
// Android (Kotlin) in MainActivity 
    fun signIn(view: View?) {
        Amplify.Auth.signInWithWebUI(
            this,
            { result: AuthSignInResult -> Log.i(TAG, result.toString()) },
            { error: AuthException -> Log.e(TAG, error.toString()) }
        )
    }

The above triggers the following web view:

Hosted UI for Cognito

Similarly, to create an item in the Datastore (and persisting it to Amazon DynamoDB over GraphQL), you need the following code:

    // iOS 
    func create() {
        let note = Note(content: "Build iOS application")
        Amplify.DataStore.save(note) {
            switch $0 {
            case .success:
                print("Added note")
            case .failure(let error):
                print("Error adding note - (error.localizedDescription)")
            }
        }
    }
   // Android 
    fun create(view: View?) {
        val note: Note = Note.builder()
            .content("Build Android application")
            .build()

        Amplify.DataStore.save(
            note,
            { success -> Log.i(TAG, "Saved item: " + success.item.content) },
            { error -> Log.e(TAG, "Could not save item to DataStore", error) }
        )

And to trigger a text translation with the Predictions category, you just need the following code:

    // iOS 
    func translate(text: String) {
        _ = Amplify.Predictions.convert(textToTranslate: text, language: LanguageType.english, targetLanguage: LanguageType.french) {
            switch $0 {
            case .success(let result):
                // update UI on main thread 
                DispatchQueue.main.async() {
                    self.data.translatedText = result.text
                }
            case .failure(let error):
                print("Error adding note - (error.localizedDescription)")
            }
        }
    }
   // Android
    fun translate(view: View?) {
        Log.i(TAG, "Translating")

        val et : EditText = findViewById(R.id.toBeTranslated)
        val tv : TextView = findViewById(R.id.translated)

        Amplify.Predictions.translateText(
            et.text.toString(),
            LanguageType.ENGLISH,
            LanguageType.FRENCH,
            { success -> tv.setText(success.translatedText) },
            { failure -> Log.e(TAG, failure.localizedMessage) }
        )
    }

Short and slick isn’t it ?

Amplify Mobile demo translation

Price and Availability
AWS Amplify is available free of charge, you only pay for the backend services your application use, above the free tier.

Amplify iOS and Amplify Android are available today from the CocoaPods and Maven Central code repository. The source code is available on GitHub (iOS or Android). Do not hesitate to send us your feedback (Doc, iOS, and Android) or to send us a Pull Request 🙂

I am also curious to learn about the amazing mobile apps you are building with AWS Amplify. Do not hesitate to share your screenshots or App Store links with me.

Happy building!

— seb

Bringing Intrinsic Security to Containers: VMware Acquires Octarine

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UPDATE: On May 27, 2020 VMware officially closed its acquisition of Octarine. The blog post below has been amended to reflect that announcement.   _______________________    Today is a very exciting day for VMware and for our customers as we announce our acquisition of Octarine, whose innovative security platform for Kubernetes applications helps simplify DevSecOps and enables cloud native environments to be more secure, from development through […]

The post Bringing Intrinsic Security to Containers: VMware Acquires Octarine appeared first on VMware Carbon Black.

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