Create NSX-T Tier-0 Gateway using Policy API

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Some Background The fact that you have ended up reading this Blog Post, most probably means you are well aware of what Policy API is, how cool and flexible it is, how you can use declarative approach to define things and just run one call to create it all. Sounds… Continue reading

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VMware Education

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As being part of the VMware Certified Instructor Community, I have a very committed to encourage individuals to attend VMware Training as this is a key part of gaining new skills and keep yourself relevant in todays ever changing IT landscape. The traditional training courses that was provide by VMware Education has always been informative. […]

VMware VM Clone via HTML5 Client Results in Incorrectly Configured VMDK

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This one is just a quick post regarding an issue I came up against just before Christmas. To get straight to the point, I found an issue where in multiple separate environments, when cloning a virtual machine via the VMware vCenter HTML5 Web client interface, if you select the tick box to “customize this virtual machine’s hardware” and… Read More »

vCD Edge SSL Certificate Management via PowerShell for tenants

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Tom Fojta has a couple of really good blog posts on his blog (https://fojta.wordpress.net/) about using Let’s Encrypt certificates on an NSX Edge Load Balancer. The first part can be found at https://fojta.wordpress.com/2016/07/16/automate-lets-encrypt-certificate-for-nsx-edge-load-balancer/ and the second part at https://fojta.wordpress.com/2019/12/21/automate-lets-encrypt-certificates-part-2/. The method described in these posts relies on connectivity with the NSX management … Continue reading

Notes from the field: Configuring SentinelOne SSO with VMware Workspace ONE Access

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SentinelOne’s configuration can be achieved after you have a valid account and support login. Afterwards its pretty easy to configure the SSO part. In the cloud console of SentinelOne go to Settings>>Integrations>>SSO Configure the following items for SSO usage: IDP Redirect URL: https://workspaceoneaccessurl:443/SAAS/API/1.0/GET/apps/launch/app/uniqueapplicationid IssuerID: https://workspaceoneaccessurl/SAAS/API/1.0/GET/metadata/idp.xml Configure the rest of the items at your own requirements … Continue reading “Notes from the field: Configuring SentinelOne SSO with VMware Workspace ONE Access”

Notes from the field: Configuring OpsGenie (without Atlassian Access) with VMware Workspace ONE Access

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OpsGenie can use SAML SSO without the use of Atlassian Access, see the following url: https://docs.opsgenie.com/docs/single-sign-on-with-opsgenie For the configuration part of Workspace ONE Access just add a new manual SAML 2.0 application and provide the following information according to above article: Single Sign On URL https://app.opsgenie.com/auth/saml?id=”uniquesamlidprovided Recipient URL https://app.opsgenie.com/auth/saml?id=”uniquesamlidprovided Application ID https://app.opsgenie.com/auth/saml?id=”uniqesamlidprovided Username Format = … Continue reading “Notes from the field: Configuring OpsGenie (without Atlassian Access) with VMware Workspace ONE Access”

Notes from the field: vCloud usage meter doesn’t meter NSX

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A while back I had an support case with VMware support regarding NSX integration and that it wasn’t getting metered by vCloud Usage Meter in a customer deployment. Turns out that Usage meter looks for a Global Transport Zone before the discovery of a Universal Transport Zone and metering can occur. So if you are … Continue reading “Notes from the field: vCloud usage meter doesn’t meter NSX”

vSAN 6.x Cluster Rebalancing

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vSAN Cluster rebalancing evenly distributes resources across the cluster to maintain consistent performance and availability.

If you remove capacity devices from the vSAN cluster, the disk groups might become unbalanced. If you add hosts or capacity devices to the vSAN cluster, the disk groups might become unbalanced. Rebalancing also occurs when you place a vSAN host in maintenance mode.

vSAN Cluster rebalancing is done using two methods.

  • Automatic Rebalance 
  • Manual Rebalance 

Automatic Rebalance:

When any capacity device in your cluster reaches 80 percent full, vSAN automatically rebalances the cluster.

Run the following RVC commands to monitor the rebalance operation in the cluster:

  • vsan.check_limits

Verifies whether the disk space use is balanced in the cluster.

  • vsan.whatif_host_failures

Analyzes the current capacity use per host, interprets whether a single host failure can force the cluster to run out of space for reprotection, and analyzes how a host failure might impact cluster capacity, cache reservation, and cluster components. The physical capacity use shown as the command output is the average use of all devices in the vSAN cluster.

  • vsan.resync_dashboard

Monitors any rebuild tasks in the cluster.

Manual Rebalance:

You can manually rebalance through the cluster health check, or by using RVC commands.

If the vSAN disk balance health check fails, you can initiate a manual rebalance. Under Cluster health, access the vSAN Disk Balance health check, and click the Rebalance Disks button.

Use the following RVC commands to manually rebalance the cluster:

vsan.check_limits – Verifies whether any capacity device in the vSAN cluster is approaching the 80 percent threshold limit.

vsan.health.cluster_rebalance – Manually starts the rebalance operation. When you run the command, vSAN scans the cluster for the current distribution of components, and begins to balance the distribution of components in the cluster. Use the command options to specify how long to run the rebalance operation in the cluster, and how much data to move each hour for each vSAN host. For more information about the command options for managing the rebalance operation in the vSAN cluster, see the RVC Command Reference Guide.

Note:

When you manually rebalance the disks, the operation runs for the selected time period, until no more data needs to be moved. The default time period is 24 hours. If no data is being moved, vSAN ends the rebalancing task.

Using Web/vSphere clients 


Navigate to the vSAN cluster.
Click the Monitor tab.

vSphere Client:

  • Under vSAN, select Health. 
  • Expand the Cluster health category, and select vSAN Disk Balance. You can review the disk balance of the hosts. 
  • In the vSAN Disk Balance page, click Disk Balance. 

vSphere Web Client:

  • Click vSAN. 
  • Under vSAN, click Health. 
  • Expand the Cluster health category, and select vSAN Disk Balance. 
  • You can review the disk balance of the hosts. 
  • Click the Proactive Rebalance Disks button to rebalance your cluster.