Introducing PowerShell as .NET Global Tool

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PowerShell is very suitable for CI/CD scenarios due to its easy and well understood scripting paradigm,
and its cross-platform support makes it great for building and testing cross-platform applications.
A .NET Global Tool is a special NuGet package that contains a console application.

A .NET Core application can be developed for various platforms like Windows, various distributions of Linux and macOS, while the same PowerShell scripts can be used for building, testing and deployment across all platforms.

Installing PowerShell Global tool

If you already have the .NET Core SDK installed, it’s easy to install PowerShell as a .NET global tool!

dotnet tool install --global PowerShell

Once installed, you can run it with pwsh.

PowerShell in .NET SDK docker containers

PowerShell has already been included as a global tool within the .NET Core 3.0 Preview Docker images since Preview.4.
These images are a great starting point for building a .NET Core CI/CD image
(you can find some awesome samples
over at the dotnet-docker repo.)

Docker files with PowerShell syntax

As PowerShell comes pre-installed, Docker files can have PowerShell syntax.
This allows you to run scripts or cmdlets as part of your Docker file.

FROM mcr.microsoft.com/dotnet/core/sdk:3.0
RUN pwsh -c Get-Date
RUN pwsh -c "Get-Module -ListAvailable | Select-Object -Property Name, Path"

Build scenarios in Docker

In addition to enabling PowerShell syntax, PowerShell scripts in the container can be easily invoked through Docker:

docker run -it -v c:myrepo:/myrepo -w /myrepo mcr.microsoft.com/dotnet/core/sdk:3.0 pwsh ./build.ps1

The NuGet package for the global tool can be found at: https://www.nuget.org/packages/PowerShell/

Please report issues or suggestions at: https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/issues/new/choose

Thank you!

Aditya Patwardhan
Senior Software Engineer
PowerShell Team
@adityapatward13

The post Introducing PowerShell as .NET Global Tool appeared first on PowerShell.

Preparing of Migration to 6.5 U2

This post was originally published on this site

Hello Experts ,

 

I have some questions about our Migration from 5.5 to 6.5 .we will replace  our virtuel datacenter equipements with new ones .

 

our Vcenter 5.5  is in our old domain x.local and the new one will be in our new domain y.com.

our ESXi 5.5 are not joined to the Domain .the authentication is locally and they use the DNS of our old domain x.local

 

before migrating to 6.5 with new Domain y.com , i would migrate our Vcenter 5.5 from x.local to y.com

 

Could you tel me the steps please ? i’m afraid if there will an impact to our VMS

 

Regards

Can’t connect to vsphere web client with “503 Service Unavailable” error

This post was originally published on this site

Hello everyone,

 

I have vsphere 6.5 run on HP DL380 G10, everything is ok in the first 1 month.

 

At Wednesday I can’t access vsphere web client with “request time out” error after click on “Login” button, i try to restart management agent services with command “services.sh restart” and after that i got error “503 Service Unavailable (Failed to connect to endpoint: [N7Vmacore4Http16LocalServiceSpecE:0x01bc5f78] _serverNamespace = / action = Allow _port = 8309)“.

 

VMs in host still runing and accessable, I has been try “esxcli” and got error “Connection failed”.

 

Anyones have idea for this error?, pls help me.

 

Thanks you so much.

 

 

Privacy and Mobile Device Apps

This post was originally published on this site

Original release date: July 9, 2019 | Last revised: November 15, 2019

What are the risks associated with mobile device apps?

Applications (apps) on your smartphone or other mobile devices can be convenient tools to access the news, get directions, pick up a ride share, or play games. But these tools can also put your privacy at risk. When you download an app, it may ask for permission to access personal information—such as email contacts, calendar inputs, call logs, and location data—from your device. Apps may gather this information for legitimate purposes—for example, a ride-share app will need your location data in order to pick you up. However, you should be aware that app developers will have access to this information and may share it with third parties, such as companies who develop targeted ads based on your location and interests.

How can you avoid malicious apps and limit the information apps collect about you?

Before installing an app

  • Avoid potentially harmful apps (PHAs). Reduce the risk of downloading PHAs by limiting your download sources to official app stores, such as your device’s manufacturer or operating system app store. Do not download from unknown sources or install untrusted enterprise certificates. Additionally—because malicious apps have been known to slip through the security of even reputable app stores—always read the reviews and research the developer before downloading and installing an app.
  • Be savvy with your apps. Before downloading an app, make sure you understand what information the app will access. Read the permissions the app is requesting and determine whether the data it is asking to access is related to the purpose of the app. Read the app’s privacy policy to see if, or how, your data will be shared. Consider foregoing the app if the policy is vague regarding with whom it shares your data or if the permissions request seems excessive.

On already installed apps

  • Review app permissions. Review the permissions each app has. Ensure your installed apps only have access to the information they need, and remove unnecessary permissions from each app. Consider removing apps with excessive permissions. Pay special attention to apps that have access to your contact list, camera, storage, location, and microphone.
  • Limit location permissions. Some apps have access to the mobile device’s location services and thus have access to the user’s approximate physical location. For apps that require access to location data to function, consider limiting this access to when the app is in use only.
  • Keep app software up to date. Apps with out-of-date software may be at risk of exploitation of known vulnerabilities. Protect your mobile device from malware by installing app updates as they are released.
  • Delete apps you do not need. To avoid unnecessary data collection, uninstall apps you no longer use.
  • Be cautious with signing into apps with social network accounts. Some apps are integrated with social network sites—in these cases, the app can collect information from your social network account and vice versa. Ensure you are comfortable with this type of information sharing before you sign into an app via your social network account. Alternatively, use your email address and a unique password to sign in.

What additional steps can you take to secure data on your mobile devices?

  • Limit activities on public Wi-Fi networks. Public Wi-Fi networks at places such as airports and coffee shops present an opportunity for attackers to intercept sensitive information. When using a public or unsecured wireless connection, avoid using apps and websites that require personal information, e.g., a username and password. Additionally, turn off the Bluetooth setting on your devices when not in use. (See Cybersecurity for Electronic Devices.)
  • Be cautious when charging. Avoid connecting your smartphone to any computer or charging station that you do not control, such as a charging station at an airport terminal or a shared computer at a library. Connecting a mobile device to a computer using a USB cable can allow software running on that computer to interact with the phone in ways you may not anticipate. For example, a malicious computer could gain access to your sensitive data or install new software. (See Holiday Traveling with Personal Internet-Enabled Devices.)
  • Protect your device from theft. Having physical access to a device makes it easier for an attacker to extract or corrupt information. Do not leave your device unattended in public or in easily accessible areas.
  • Protect your data if your device is stolen. Ensure your device requires a password or biometric identifier to access it, so if is stolen, thieves will have limited access to its data. (See Choosing and Protecting Passwords.) If your device is stolen, immediately contact your service provider to protect your data. (See the Federal Communications Commission’s Consumer Guide: Protect Your Smart Device.)

References

Author: CISA

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.

Privacy and Mobile Device Apps

This post was originally published on this site

Original release date: July 9, 2019

What are the risks associated with mobile device apps?

Applications (apps) on your smartphone or other mobile devices can be convenient tools to access the news, get directions, pick up a ride share, or play games. But these tools can also put your privacy at risk. When you download an app, it may ask for permission to access personal information—such as email contacts, calendar inputs, call logs, and location data—from your device. Apps may gather this information for legitimate purposes—for example, a ride-share app will need your location data in order to pick you up. However, you should be aware that app developers will have access to this information and may share it with third parties, such as companies who develop targeted ads based on your location and interests.

How can you avoid malicious apps and limit the information apps collect about you?

Before installing an app

  • Avoid potentially harmful apps (PHAs) – Reduce the risk of downloading PHAs by limiting your download sources to official app stores, such as your device’s manufacturer or operating system app store. Do not download from unknown sources or install untrusted enterprise certificates. Additionally—because malicious apps have been known to slip through the security of even reputable app stores—always read the reviews and research the developer before downloading and installing an app.
  • Be savvy with your apps – Before downloading an app, make sure you understand what information the app will access. Read the permissions the app is requesting and determine whether the data it is asking to access is related to the purpose of the app. Read the app’s privacy policy to see if, or how, your data will be shared. Consider foregoing the app if the policy is vague regarding with whom it shares your data or if the permissions request seems excessive.

On already installed apps

  • Review app permissions – Review the permissions each app has. Ensure your installed apps only have access to the information they need, and remove unnecessary permissions from each app. Consider removing apps with excessive permissions. Pay special attention to apps that have access to your contact list, camera, storage, location, and microphone.
  • Limit location permissions – Some apps have access to the mobile device’s location services and thus have access to the user’s approximate physical location. For apps that require access to location data to function, consider limiting this access to when the app is in use only.
  • Keep app software up to date – Apps with out-of-date software may be at risk of exploitation of known vulnerabilities. Protect your mobile device from malware by installing app updates as they are released.
  • Delete apps you do not need – To avoid unnecessary data collection, uninstall apps you no longer use.
  • Be cautious with signing into apps with social network accounts – Some apps are integrated with social network sites—in these cases, the app can collect information from your social network account and vice versa. Ensure you are comfortable with this type of information sharing before you sign into an app via your social network account. Alternatively, use your email address and a unique password to sign in.

What additional steps can you take to secure data on your mobile devices?

  • Limit activities on public Wi-Fi networks – Public Wi-Fi networks at places such as airports and coffee shops present an opportunity for attackers to intercept sensitive information. When using a public or unsecured wireless connection, avoid using apps and websites that require personal information, e.g., a username and password. Additionally, turn off the Bluetooth setting on your devices when not in use. (See Cybersecurity for Electronic Devices.)
  • Be cautious when charging – Avoid connecting your smartphone to any computer or charging station that you do not control, such as a charging station at an airport terminal or a shared computer at a library. Connecting a mobile device to a computer using a USB cable can allow software running on that computer to interact with the phone in ways you may not anticipate. For example, a malicious computer could gain access to your sensitive data or install new software. (See Holiday Traveling with Personal Internet-Enabled Devices.)
  • Protect your device from theft – Having physical access to a device makes it easier for an attacker to extract or corrupt information. Do not leave your device unattended in public or in easily accessible areas. (See Protecting Portable Devices: Physical Security.)
  • Protect your data if your device is stolen – Ensure your device requires a password or biometric identifier to access it, so if is stolen, thieves will have limited access to its data. (See Choosing and Protecting Passwords.) If your device is stolen, immediately contact your service provider to protect your data. (See the Federal Communications Commission’s Consumer Guide: Protect Your Smart Device.)

References

Author: CISA

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.

Slow rendering performance in Windows 10

This post was originally published on this site

Hi,

 

I’m experiencing slow rendering performance in some apps. I noticed that primarily WPF based apps perform poorly. After tinkering around a bit I decided to disable 3D acceleration. This seemed to “restore” rendering performance for the WPF based apps but rendering in general seems now a bit more sluggish.

 

Also boot performance (APFS drive) is really slow and working with a volume shared from the Mac is also painfully slow (working with source code and compiling in Visual Studio). I could workaround the latter by moving the source files to the Windows “internal” drive.

 

Coming from Parallels (where I also had massive perf issues), it’s still better but I was wondering if vmware will address these issues sooner or later. I did some research in the forum and I can see that most issues I’m experiencing are known for > 1 year sometimes.

 

I’m running my vm on vmware Fusion 11 on an iMac Pro (plenty of CPU and RAM left for macOS).

 

Regards,
Stefan

VCSA 6.7U2 Migration from 6.5.0 Windows vCenter

This post was originally published on this site

  I’m trying to migrate / update from a Windows vCenter (6.5 build 6816762) to a VCSA 6.7 U2.

 

I’ve checked that the upgrade path is supported, however am running into some issues when the postgres database is being imported into the VCSA.

 

The deployment completes the VCSA deployment, and captures the source DB / info. Then when running through step 2 of the migration phase it fails at 40% with the following;

 

Error

Encountered an internal error. see /var/log/firstboot/vpostgres-firstboot.py_xxxx_stderr.log

 

Resolution

This is an unrecoverable error, please retry install. If you run into this error again, please collect a support bundle and open a support request.

 

within the log “vpostgres-firstboot.py_xxxx_stderr.log” it says:

2019-07-01T06:47:52.496Z   Upgrade import step failed

2019-07-01T06:47:52.496Z   vPostgres firstboot(action=firstboot) failed

 

If i dig a bit further into the logs I can see the following warning under the /var/log/vmware/vpostgres/postgresql-01.log file;

 

“2019-07-01 06:47:52.496 UTC 5d19ac88.357a 18284 VCDB postgres  STATEMENT: ALTER TABLE vpx_vm_sn_virtual_device ADD CONSTRAINT fk_vpx_vm_sn_virtual_device FOREIGN KEY (id) REFERENCES vpx_snapshot(id) ON DELETE CASCADE;”

 

2019-07-01 06:47:52.496 UTC 5d19ac88.357a 18284 VCDB postgres   ERROR: insert or update on table “vpx_vm_sn_virtual_device” violates foreign key constraint “fk_vpx_vm_sn_virtualdevice”

 

In /var/log/vmware/vpxd/vcdb_import.err the file ends with;

 

psql.bin:/storage/seat/cis-export-folder/vcdb/create_constr.sql:1073:  ERROR: insert or update on table “vpx_vm_sn_virtual_device” violates foreign key constraint “fk_vpx_vm_sn_virtual_device”

DETAIL:  Key (id)=(12246) is not present in table “vpx_snapshot”

 

The error suggests to me that there is a referenced snapshot or something that is not ‘right’. After shutting down the VCSA and powering on the original Windows server, I’ve checked all the VMs for snapshots and non have any (none need disk consolidation and no delta files exist).

 

If i connect to the postgresql VCDB database and run SELECT * FROM vpx_snapshot;

 

It returns (0 rows).

 

I’ve logged a ticket with VMware support, but thought I’d try my luck here in case anyone else has had the same issue and been able to resolve it while I wait.

 

TIA